Black Friday binoculars deals: Magnificent savings on Celestron, Nikon, Bushnell and more

black friday binocular deals
(Image credit: celestron, nikon, vortex)

These Black Friday binoculars deals are a fantastic way to observe nature up close without disturbing the peace. With these amazing binoculars deals, you can get the right pair of binoculars for much less, whether you're looking for birds, whales, planets, or stars.

At a casual glance, binoculars look all the same and in essence do the same thing. But every pair is unique, with particular features that suit them to one type of sightseeing. 

Some models, such as Nikon's 10x42 ProStaff 3S (opens in new tab) or ACULON A211 8x42 (opens in new tab), have wide fields of view, making them ideal for sightseeing trips in nature. Bushnell's Powerview 20x50 model (opens in new tab) has larger lenses that can achieve much higher magnifications; this makes them perfect for astronomy. Sometimes you might want less magnification too, such as those on the Celestron 8x42 Outland X (opens in new tab), which are perfect for viewing wildlife from afar or on bumpy boat rides.

Even the best of us can feel a little confused with all of the technical details involved in describing binocular lenses. To help you find the ideal pair at the best price, Live Science has compiled the top binoculars bargains.

If you want to nature-watch with your kids, then check out our list of the best binoculars for kids as well. Or, you can alternatively keep them entertained with these deals on educational science kits for kids (opens in new tab).  

Best binoculars deals

now $139.98 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Hexeum Night Vision Binoculars: was $298 now $139.98 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

These night vision binoculars from Hexeum are now a whopping 53% off at Amazon. These would be perfect outdoor activities, night hunting, patrol detection, security and surveilla, search & rescue, camping, watching wildlife and scenery.

, now $174.95 at B&H Photo (opens in new tab)

Celestron SkyMaster 18-40x80 Zoom Binocular: was $258.95, now $174.95 at B&H Photo (opens in new tab)
These incredible Celestron binoculars provide 8x magnification with 40 mm diameter lenses; the large objective diameter means you get a comfortable viewing aperture even at higher magnification levels. A Tripod adaptor is included and long eye relief makes viewing more comfortable for glasses-wearers.

, now $62.94 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Celestron Outland X 8x42 Binocular: was $99.95, now $62.94 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
You can now get over $30 off the Outland X 8x42 Binoculars at Amazon. Multi-coated optics deliver high-contrast views and BaK-4 glass will enhance the color of your view. Waterproof and fog proof, with protective rubber covering.

, now $69.42 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Celestron Outland X 10x42 Binocular: was $104.95, now $69.42 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
You can now get $35 off the Outland X 10x42 Binoculars at Amazon. Twist-up eyecups allow for quick eye relief adjustment for a comfortable observing experience, while multicoated optics offer excellent contrast and clarity.

now $99.99 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Nikon 10x42 ProStaff 3S Binoculars: $129.95 now $99.99 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
Snag this high-powered set of binoculars for $30 off. The binoculars boast silver-alloy-coated roof prisms (those internal prisms that magnify and transmit light) and anti-reflection multicoated optics for clear, high-contrast and brightly colored views. Compared with the 7S series, this 3S Prostaff series has a wider field of view, meaning you can more easily watch moving objects like birds or anything else you're interested in. 

Celestron 8x32 TrailSeeker Binoculars (opens in new tab)

Celestron TrailSeeker 8x32 Binocular: was $279.95, now $159 at  Amazon (opens in new tab)
The Celestron TrailSeeker 8x32 binocular has a huge 43% discount on Amazon for Black Friday. The binoculars are weatherproof if you get caught in the rain and are good for close and mid-range observations.

now $325.13 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Celestron TrailSeeker ED 8x42 Binoculars: was $379.95 now $325.13 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Amazon have already knocked over $50 off the Celestron TrailSeeker ED 8x42 binoculars, but they are also offering a further $30 discount when you apply a coupon. These binoculars feature premium ED (Extra-Low Dispersion) objective lenses, virtually eliminating chromatic aberration or color fringing.

now $274.95 on Amazon (opens in new tab)

Celestron TrailSeeker 8x42 Binoculars: was $299.95 now $274.95 on Amazon (opens in new tab)

The Celestron TrailSeeker binocular features 8x magnification and a wide field, and with a sturdy magnesium alloy frame that is lightweight and completely waterproof, it can be used in any weather. 

Celestron SkyMaster 25x100 (opens in new tab)

Celestron SkyMaster 25x100 Binocular: was $499.95, now $400.52 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
Now 20% off, the SkyMaster 25x100 Binocular offers superb views of the night sky. Offering maximum brightness even in low-light conditions and at a long range, this binocular is great for terrestrial and astronomical sights. Comes with a carrying case. 

, now $209.99 at Adorama (opens in new tab)

Vortex Optics Diamondback HD Binoculars - was $259.99, now $209.99 at Adorama (opens in new tab)
Save $50 off these Vortex HD binoculars with 8x magnification and 32mm objective lenses. They're optimized with select glass elements to deliver exceptional resolution, and are waterproof and fog proof.

, now $64.06 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Bushnell Powerview 20x50 Binoculars - was $94.99, now $64.06 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Amazon offers great optics for a competitive price and the Powerview 20x50 is no exception. Now at an even more competitive price with a further $10 off, the InstaFocus system inside the binocular's body offers a great view when locking onto wildlife subjects.

Celestron 18-40x80 SkyMaster Zoom Binoculars: $174.95 at B&H Photo (opens in new tab)

Celestron 18-40x80 SkyMaster Zoom Binoculars: $174.95 at B&H Photo (opens in new tab)

Currently the lowest price we've seen, the Celestron 18-40x80 SkyMaster Zoom Binoculars are a great choice for long-duration astronomical or long-distance terrestrial land use with its oversized aperture and powerful zoom range.

now £113 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Celestron Outland X 10x50 Binocular: was $149.95 now £113 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Save 25% on these waterproof and fog proof Celestron binoculars with 10x magnification, designed to meet the needs of every outdoor enthusiast. Amazon are also offering a further $15 off with a coupon, but no word on how long this will last.

now $112.28 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Celestron Nature DX 8x42 Binoculars: was $169.95 now $112.28 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Save 34% on these Celestron Nature DX 8x42 binoculars with 8x magnification and 42mm objective lenses. They feature a rubber-armored, polycarbonate housing and are waterproof and fog proof.

now $141.08 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Celestron Nature DX ED 8x42  Binoculars: was $209.95 now $141.08 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

For just $20 more than the regular Celestron Nature DX binoculars, these include extra-low dispersion (ED) objective lenses providing high resolution, High contrast images that are virtually free of optical defects like chromatic aberration and color fringing.

now $899 at B&H Photo (opens in new tab)

Canon 10x32 IS Image Stabilized Binoculars: was $1099 now $899 at B&H Photo (opens in new tab)

While they may seem pricey, Canon have adapted the IS system from their line of EF lenses that detect and counter the appearance of hand-shake, so if excellent, steady image quality is what you're looking for, you can't go wrong here.

now $289.97 at Encalife (opens in new tab)

Encalife Extra Low Dispersion Binoculars: was $329.97 now $289.97 at Encalife (opens in new tab)

These durable binoculars from Encalife are now $40 off, featuring extra-low dispersion glass which prevents color fringing while providing high-resolution, high contrast images. These binoculars are a great choice for concerts, birdwatching and outdoor activities.

How to choose your binoculars

Haven’t decided which pair of binoculars is right for you? Here are some things to consider: How do you plan to use the binoculars: bird and nature watching, or skywatching? Some binoculars are made for being out in nature when the sun is bright, for instance, or perhaps a rugged, shock-resistant coating is in order for a heavy-duty adventure. After you have that figured out, as well as  your budget, here’s what to look for when scanning the stores for the best binoculars deals: 

Magnification and lens size: The two numbers that describe binoculars refer to the magnification (first number) and lens diameter. For instance, a set of 10 x 52 binoculars are equipped with 10x magnification and 52 millimeter lenses. Both 8x and 10x magnification are considered optimal to prevent shaking and show a stable image nearby and far away. Lens size determines the amount of light let in. In low-light settings, you might want binoculars with lenses that are larger than 42 mm. 

Field of view: The FOV indicates how wide an image can be seen through a binoculars' lenses. The wider the FOV, the easier it will be to find what you’re looking for. However, there are trade-offs. The higher the magnification, the lower the FOV. According to Bushnell, companies measure FOV in feet at 1,000 yards, or the field of view you’d have if you were to measure it from 1,000 yards away. 

Size/shape: Depending on where you plan to lug your binoculars, the physical size and weight can matter. Big and bulky might be fine for one adventurer, while another is interested in pocket-friendly binoculars that still feature powerful optics. 

If you're ready for an outdoor adventure, keep checking back for more deals on binoculars for 2021.

Jeanna Bryner
Live Science Editor-in-Chief

Jeanna served as editor-in-chief of Live Science. Previously, she was an assistant editor at Scholastic's Science World magazine. Jeanna has an English degree from Salisbury University, a master's degree in biogeochemistry and environmental sciences from the University of Maryland, and a graduate science journalism degree from New York University. She has worked as a biologist in Florida, where she monitored wetlands and did field surveys for endangered species. She also received an ocean sciences journalism fellowship from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.