Best binoculars 2022: Our picks for stargazing, bird watching, and observing wildlife

Man using binoculars whilst hiking in the woods with his friends
(Image credit: fstop123 via Getty Images)

If you’re looking to invest in a pair of the best binoculars, be it animals, watching the headline act at a festival, or following sports from a distance, our guide will have you covered.

The first thing to decide on is your budget. More substantially built binoculars will naturally come with a premium price tag. You’ll also end up paying extra for features such as water- or fogproofing.

The other main features to look for when seeking out the best binoculars are the degree of magnification provided and the size of the objective lens in use. Generally, the rule of thumb is the bigger (and so brighter) the lens, the better. Though obviously there are trade-offs to be made in terms of size and weight versus portability. You’ll also want to take note of a long eye relief, which allows for a degree of comfort and enables the binoculars to be held further from the face.

Those who want to ensure a steady, judder-free image might want to consider binoculars with some form of built-in stabilization or those that can accommodate a tripod, which again adds to the cost. However, once you invest in a pair of the best binoculars, they’ll usually last you a lifetime.

While we’re looking at the best binoculars on the market here, if you’re specifically seeking some for younger users, then our list of best binoculars for kids have some budget-friendlier recommendations. Or if you’re interested in astronomy then the best binoculars for stargazing might be right for you.

Best binoculars

Zeiss SFL 40 binoculars

(Image credit: Zeiss)

1. Zeiss SFL 40

Lightweight and compact pair of binos without compromise

Specifications

Magnification: 10x
Objective lens diameter: 40 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 140 m
Eye relief: 18 mm
Weight: 640 g

Reasons to buy

+
Rugged construction
+
Compact and relatively lightweight
+
Pretty much the best in optics available at the price

Reasons to avoid

-
Premium brand means premium prices

Coming from one of the world’s most renowned optical experts, whose lens expertise is also utilized by the likes of Sony and Panasonic, means that the cleverly compact Zeiss SFL 40 doesn’t come cheap, whether we’re opting for a choice of the available 8x or 10x magnification.

Despite the specification allying this to a bright 40 mm lens offering 90% light transmission, use of thinner lens elements has thankfully allowed its maker to give us a compact size. At the same time, we also get a lightweight yet rugged feel, thanks in part to the magnesium housing.

A field of view of up to 140 m at a distance of 1,000 m (8x model) and a closest focusing distance of 1.5 m for both magnifications makes this a jack of all trades. But, when taking the large-ish objective lens into consideration along with the size, it’s particularly well suited to nature and wildlife watching, even in fading light.


Leica Noctivid 10x42 Green binoculars

(Image credit: Leica)

2. Leica Noctivid 10x42

Large lensed premium binoculars that are a birdwatcher’s dream

Specifications

Magnification: 10x
Objective lens diameter: 42 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 135 m
Eye relief: 19 mm
Weight: 853 g

Reasons to buy

+
Compact yet durable construction
+
Rubber armored exterior aids grip and absorbs impact
+
Watertight to a depth of 5 m
+
Excellent light transmission

Reasons to avoid

-
High price
-
Relatively weighty

Leica is another key brand providing some of the best binoculars out there when it comes to optical excellence tied to a durable build. Here the Leica Noctivid 10x42 comes in either 8x42 or 10x42 combinations of magnification and objective lens size. Other pluses include a compact construction with a rubber armored exterior aiding a tight grip, while possible lens reflection is suppressed enough to deliver a detailed view with plenty of contrast.

Though suitable for general-purpose use, these would be ideal for viewing nature, sports, and outdoor events. Its large-ish objective lens is not only great for daytime viewing, but also in the early evening too. On top of this, the Leica Noctivid has a nitrogen-filled magnesium housing to help prevent fogging and is watertight to a depth of 5 m.

Possible accessories for the more adventurous include an optional floating strap and an adapter for a tripod. If you’re buying a Leica, you’re buying a tool for life and that feels very much the case here.


Olympus 8x42 PRO binoculars

(Image credit: Olympus)

3. Olympus 8x42 PRO

An able travel companion, these portable roof prism type binos are for bringing wildlife closer

Specifications

Magnification: 8x
Objective lens diameter: 42 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 13.1 m
Eye relief: 16 mm
Weight: 670 g

Reasons to buy

+
Shrugs off any inclement weather
+
Compact and portable
+
Delivers decent magnification…

Reasons to avoid

-
… although an even greater magnification may be beneficial for wildlife watching
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High-end features mean high-end prices

Heading off on safari soon? For nature lovers, the Olympus 8x42 PRO is a more affordable option than those from Leica or Zeiss. These binos are a decent value pair which we feel provides a good balance when it comes to size and weight, especially as they offer peace of mind coming courtesy of a 15-year warranty.

Defined as a ‘Pro’ option, they feature the same nano-coated high performance ‘Zuiko’ optics, complete with ED lenses, as the Olympus camera range. This results in unprecedented light transmission for their class. With a slender and simple nitrogen filled construction, we get the ability to focus on subjects as close as 1.5 m, as well as a 1,000 m away. Plus, a dioptric adjustment ring and extendable eye relief provide comfort for those who wear glasses.

Those wanting something even more powerful and are willing to spend a little bit more are directed to the alternative 10x42 model, also from Olympus.


Olympus 10x25 WP II binoculars

(Image credit: Olympus )
Affordable entry-level pair of binoculars that are foldable for added portability

Specifications

Magnification: 10x
Objective lens diameter: 25 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 114 m
Eye relief: 12 mm
Weight: 270 g

Reasons to buy

+
Lightweight and portable thanks to folding design
+
Waterproofed plus nitrogen filled to prevent fogging

Reasons to avoid

-
Central focusing wheel is a bit stiff
-
A larger objective lens would improve view clarity

Those looking for one of the best budget binoculars should look no further than the Olympus 10x25 WP II. Suitable for a wide range of scenarios, this foldable option from Olympus is waterproofed and is also rubber coated for an improved grip. Providing fuss free operation, we were able to pluck these binos from the box and start using them straight away.

A centrally positioned focus knob affords easy adjustment and prevents needing to take a step forward or backwards. Similarly, the multi-coated lenses ensure sharpness into the corners, for crisp and clear observation, while the on-board dioptric correction can be adjusted to suit individual eyesight – handy for those who wear glasses.

While these binos are obviously designed to bring the faraway up close and personal, they also have a close focusing distance of 1.5 meters. All this coupled with a whopping 25-year warranty make the Olympus 10x25 WP II one of the best binoculars out there.


Canon 10x42L IS WP binoculars

(Image credit: Canon)
Powerful binoculars that stand out from the crowd thanks to its built-in image stabilization

Specifications

Magnification: 10x
Objective lens diameter: 42 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 104 m
Eye relief: 16 m
Weight: 1.1 kg

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to maintain a firm grip
+
Canon’s first IS binoculars to offer waterproofing
+
Powerful magnification
+
Offers anti-shake observation

Reasons to avoid

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Requires 2 x AA batteries for image stabilization
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Lens caps don’t match the quality of the rest of the device
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Weighty to hold for extended periods
-
Expensive

A powerful magnification allied to a large objective lens can often result in large and heavy binoculars which can lead to a wobbly image at maximum magnification when the binoculars are used handheld. Aiming to get around that is the Canon 10x42L IS WP, with the ‘IS’ denoting a built-in image stabilization powered by two AA batteries – the outcome being a judder free view of faraway subjects. Of course, the need for batteries inevitably adds both weight (here over 1 kg in total) and bulk, but keen birdwatchers who are holding binos for longer periods may well find the tradeoff is worth it.

However, this pair of binos is not just a one-trick pony. As well as waterproofing and a closest focusing distance of 2.5 m, the Canon 10x42L IS also features ultra-low dispersion glass elements to correct any distortion and avoid purple fringing between high contrast elements in an image. In short, this Canon provides a rock-solid combination of wobble-free viewing and image clarity, albeit at a price.


Canon 10x20 IS binoculars

(Image credit: Canon)

6. Canon 10x20 IS

Want built-in image stabilization and a compact pair of binoculars to boot? Then look no further.

Specifications

Magnification: 10x
Objective lens diameter: 20 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 93 m
Eye relief: 13.5 mm
Weight: 430 g without batteries

Reasons to buy

+
Body integral image stabilization reduces eye strain
+
Relatively compact and lightweight

Reasons to avoid

-
Not water-resistant
-
Paying a premium for the built-in anti shake technology

Resembling something out of Star Wars, these bulbous lens-shifting, image stabilized, porro prism type binos are some of the best out there in terms of ensuring a steady image when held in the hand. Once again, if we need an integral anti-shake feature powered by a responsive built-in gyro sensor, we look to Canon. Requiring a single lithium-ion battery lasting up to 12 hours of use to power said anti shake feature, the weight without is a manageable 430 g, making them the world’s lightest of their type.

Attendant features of the Canon 10x20 IS include a closest focusing distance of 2 m, while a neck strap and carry case are included. These would be ideal for wildlife and sports, for which clarity and sharpness are especially essential. Although be warned if outdoor use is your thing; this particular option makes no claim for being water resistant, which is arguably its one downside.

You can also check out the slightly larger Canon 10x32 IS if you need something with a little more zoom.


Leica Trinovid 8x42 HD binoculars

(Image credit: Leica)

7. Leica Trinovid 8x42 HD

Premium build allied to a premium performance that’ll last a lifetime

Specifications

Magnification: 8x
Objective lens diameter: 42 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 123.5 m
Eye relief: 17 mm
Weight: 730 g

Reasons to buy

+
Razor sharp viewing
+
Accurate color fidelity
+
Broad depth of field
+
Water resistant construction

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive when compared with other brands boasting similar features
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Power users may be better off spending a bit more on the 10x42 option
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Weighty

While they may be pricey when compared with ‘budget’ binoculars, this series is actually Leica’s entry-level option. However, if you’re looking for a well-crafted pair of ‘bins’ that’ll last a lifetime, we believe that the cost for the Leica Trinovid 8x42 HD is worth splashing out on.

German brand Leica’s ‘Trinovid’ comes with an ergonomic construction, true internal focusing, and a superior optical performance. These binos are roughly the width of a CD case when unfolded and offer a closest focusing distance of 1.8 m. We particularly love that when gripped with both hands, the central focusing wheels falls directly under the forefinger.

For power users Leica offers a 10x42 version, but as ever it’s a tradeoff between power, physical size, and price. With this brand we get durability too, with the claim being that they’re water resistant to a depth of 4 m, along with the fact they’re O-ring sealed and nitrogen purged to prevent fogging.

In short, if we really are looking for the best binoculars, then this device has most of the boxes that matter ticked. Years of use will reward those brave enough to put up the cash.


Steiner 10x26 Safari Ultrasharp binoculars

(Image credit: Steiner)

8. Steiner 10x26 Safari Ultrasharp

Compact and ultra-portable binoculars suitable for sightseeing, and that’s just for starters

Specifications

Magnification: 10x
Objective lens diameter: 26 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 101 m
Eye relief: 11 m
Weight: 297 g

Reasons to buy

+
Ultra-compact and lightweight
+
Good value for money option
+
Decent quality waterproof construction
+
Respectable results

Reasons to avoid

-
Not great in low light
-
No tripod connectivity

Steiner is another well-respected binocular brand. This ultra-compact offering is perfect for anyone wanting to watch sports or who just require a small yet powerful option when travelling. In short, the ‘Safari’ in Steiner 10x26 Safari Ultrasharp doesn’t even begin to convey the broad range of uses these binos offer up.

The 26 mm objective lens appear modest on paper compared to the alternatives in our buyer’s guide, but these polycarbonate binos make an ideal companion for those seeking an all-in-one device: They’re waterproof, fog-proof, and their rubber eyecups are comfortable whether used with or without glasses. Plus, their rubberized finish, with a ridged and roughened body, feels great to grip.

The UV glass coated Steiner 10x26 Safari Ultrasharp binoculars maintain sharpness across the field of view and commendably into the corners. Even when conditions aren’t the best, these deliver accurate colors and reasonable brightness.

Due to the lightweight build, it’s tricky to hold the binos completely steady, particularly when viewing objects at greater distances. That said, for operability and an almost pocket-money price, these German brand binoculars are hard to beat.


Celestron Nature DX 10x56 binoculars

(Image credit: Celestron)
Mid-range multi-purpose binoculars suitable for observing nature in the great outdoors

Specifications

Magnification: 10x
Objective lens diameter: 56 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 3 m
Eye relief: 18.2 mm
Weight: 1.1 kg

Reasons to buy

+
Large objective lens for better quality in low light
+
Rugged polycarbonate construction
+
Multi-coated optics to further optimize light transmission

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy in the hand when used for extended periods
-
Tripod adapter not included

With the rough rule of thumb being the larger the lens the more light that gets lets in, the relatively huge 56 mm objective lens of the Celestron Nature DX 10x56 makes it a great option for those who want to continue observing nature into the twilight hours. They’re also suitable for any wet and wild adventures due to the binoculars’ housing being nitrogen filled to avoid fogging in damp conditions, as well as being waterproofed.

Long, twist-up eyecups provide comfort, which will be a relief to anyone wearing glasses, whilst the multi-coated lenses further aid visibility. The Celestron Nature DX 10x56 has a durable polycarbonate construction and a closest focusing distance of 3 m.

However, a large lens does result in a heavy device, with these weighing in at just over a kilo, and this means that extended use may result in weary limbs. Yes, it can be attached to a tripod, but you’ll need to buy an additional adapter to be able to do that. Nevertheless, this a great value option for those seeking a brighter pair of optics, despite the weight.


Bushnell 15x56 Forge binoculars

(Image credit: Bushnell)
Premium build with powerful magnification suitable for just about any observational pursuit

Specifications

Magnification: 15x
Objective lens diameter: 56 mm
Field of view at 1,000 meters: 78 m
Eye relief: 21 mm
Weight: 1 kg

Reasons to buy

+
Durable construction
+
Precision engineered
+
Multiple lens coatings boost clarity

Reasons to avoid

-
Requires steady hands or preferably a tripod
-
Not exactly pocket sized
-
Focus wheel can get slippery if wet

The Bushnell brand is known for good value, reliable performance, as well as suitability for a wide range of observational pursuits. The Bushnell 15x56 Forge binoculars are no exception, providing a major lure for those wanting a powerful magnification to get as close to faraway subjects as possible.

Rain or shine, these binoculars are great for the outdoors as they’re waterproof. In addition to this, its large objective lens lets in as much light as possible and sharpness is boosted via prime ED glass (a generous application of lens coatings to improve light transmission).

Inevitably these aren’t the lightest binos to use, at around 1 kg, though a neck strap is provided for added comfort. And it has to be noted that flagship, premium build binos such as these do command a premium price, even from the normally cost-conscious Bushnell. You do get a few extras, however, such as Bushnell’s exclusive ‘EXO’ barrier protection – a lens coating that bonds to the glass at a molecular level which prevents scratches while repelling water, oil, debris, and dust.

Gavin has over 30 year experience of writing about photography and television. He is currently the editor of British Photographic Industry News, and previously served as editor of Which Digital Camera and deputy editor of Total Digital Photography. 


He has also written for a wide range of publications including T3, BBC Focus, Empire, NME, Radio Times, MacWorld, Computer Active, What Digital Camera and Rough Guide books.


He also writes on a number of specialist subjects including binoculars and monoculars, spotting scopes, microscopes, trail cameras, action cameras, body cameras, filters, cameras straps and more.