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2013 Atlantic Hurricane Names

Hurricane Sandy Growth 121029
Hurricane Sandy
Credit: NASA / NOAA

Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean basin (which includes the northern Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea) officially begins on June 1 and ends on Nov. 30 each year. There is a set list of names, determined by the World Meteorological Organization, that will be used for any storm that reaches tropical storm status or higher (tropical storms have winds of 39 mph, or 63 km/h, or higher).

Each list is used on a six-year rotating basis — so the names used for 2013 will be used again in 2019. New names are added to the list when an old name is retired, which happened most recently with Hurricane Sandy (it was replaced by "Sara" on the now-2018 list). Names are retired when the damage wrought by a storm would make using its name again insensitive to those affected by an earlier storm.

Each list of hurricane names in the Atlantic basin alternates between male and female names, running through the alphabet (though there are no names beginning with Q, U, X, Y or Z).

Below is the list of 2013 names. The list will be updated with the latest news on each storm as it forms.

  • Tropical Storm Andrea - Tropical Storm Andrea kicked off the 2013 hurricane season, forming in the Gulf of Mexico on the evening of June 5, then making landfall over Florida, dumping considerable amounts of rain and even spawning some tornadoes. The storm continued up the East Coast of the United States, continuing to drop heavy rain and causing flooding.
  • Tropical Storm Barry - Tropical Storm Barry originated as a tropical wave in the southern Caribbean Sea that traveled over the Yucatan Peninsula as Tropical Depression Two, dumping heavy rains. Its journey over land was expected to keep it from intensifying, but it strengthened into a tropical storm over the Bay of Campeche before making landfall again over Veracruz, Mexico, on June 20.
  • Tropical Storm Chantal - Chantal originated as a tropical wave before reaching tropical storm strength on July 8. Just two days later, wind shear tore the storm apart and it was downgraded to a wave. Its remnants caused major rainfall and flooding on Hispaniola, home to the Dominican Republic and Haiti.
  • Tropical Storm Dorian - Originating as a tropical wave that emerged over the Atlantic Ocean from West Africa, Dorian intensified into a full-fledged storm two days later, on July 24. It moved westward before weakening into a tropical wave again, then re-strengthening into a tropical depression again to the east of Florida before weakening and dissipating.
  • Tropical Storm Erin - Tropical Storm Erin formed as a tropical wave off the coast of Africa before intensifying into a tropical depression on Aug. 14. The system headed west toward the Cape Verde Islands, quickly growing into a tropical storm by the morning of Aug. 15. Erin then ran into cool, dry air over the Eastern Atlantic and weakened into a tropical depression again.
  • Tropical Storm Fernand - Tropical Storm Fernand formed as Tropical Depression Six over the Bay of Campeche on the afternoon of Aug. 25. Just two hours later, it strengthened into a tropical storm. It made landfall as a tropical storm along the gulf coast of Mexico in the wee hours of the morning on Aug. 26, dumping rain, before slowly dissipating later in the day.
  • Tropical Storm Gabrielle - Gabrielle began life as Tropical Depression 7 on Sept. 4, 2013, to the east of the Lesser Antilles. It strengthened into a tropical storm just six hours later. By the following morning, atmospheric conditions had worn away at the storm and it was downgraded to a tropical depression, which brushed the eastern tip of Hispaniola. The storm had dissipated, but was being watched for possible re-emergence, which happened on Sept. 9, when Gabrielle once again became a tropical storm. The storm seesawed between the two statuses over the next few days, but did impact Bermuda as a tropical storm, before dissipating for good after it moved northward over the Atlantic.
  • Hurricane Humberto
  • Hurricane Ingrid
  • Jerry
  • Karen
  • Lorenzo
  • Melissa
  • Nestor
  • Olga
  • Pablo
  • Rebekah
  • Sebastien
  • Tanya
  • Van
  • Wendy

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