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Dancing Dinos

Credit: Sydney Mohr.
Feathered dinosaurs might have used muscular tails to shake tail feathers and lure the opposite sex, researchers say.

Scientists analyzed 75-million-year-old fossils of feathered, two-legged dinosaurs known as oviraptors retrieved during expeditions to the Gobi Desert in Mongolia. Although oviraptors were members of the meat-eating theropods, making them relatives of such fearsome predators as T. rex and Velociraptor, most oviraptors had beaks that lacked teeth.

[Full Story: Shake It! Dinosaurs Waggled Flashy Tails to Woo Mates]   Less «
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