Best Fitbit 2022

Image of Fitbit Luxe
(Image credit: Future/Lloyd Coombes)

When you think of fitness trackers, the name Fitbit is the first on many people’s minds — but with the brand now offering so many options, which is the best Fitbit?

To put this question to bed once and for all, our fitness team got their hands on top models and put them to the test, comparing how each one performed before deciding which model deserves to stand atop Fitbit’s esteemed podium as the brand’s best fitness tracker (opens in new tab)

With a slew of new releases in September, including the hotly-anticipated Sense 2, Versa 4 and Inspire 3, we’re also in the process of reviewing these latest additions to the Fitbit family, and will update this list as soon as our experts’ verdicts are in. 

So, if you’re in the market for a new Fitbit but don’t know which one to go for, strap in and read on. Below we’ve laid bare the pros and cons of each model, from the budget-friendly Inspire 2 to the premium features of the Sense, to help you decide which wearable deserves a spot on your wrist. 

Best Fitbit

Fitbit Sense showing steps taken

(Image credit: Lloyd Coombes)
Best Fitbit overall

Specifications

Battery life: Around six days
GPS: Yes
Water resistance: Up to 50 metres
Display: 1.58” OLED

Reasons to buy

+
Great design
+
More sensors than any other Fitbit
+
Stress tracking 

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
 No App Store a la Apple Watch 

If you're trying to draw comparisons between Fitbit vs Apple watch (opens in new tab), this is the model which comes closes to Apple's premium wearable.

It has a big, beautiful display, a slimline design and battery life that’ll make an Apple Watch weep – up to six days of use (and sleep tracking) on a single charge. 

It comes with six months of Fitbit Premium to help users embrace activity and rest in equal measure, and offers options like a stress tracker that measures your stress levels through the sweat of your palm.

There’s no third-party App Store alternative as you’d find with the similarly priced Apple Watch, which is a shame – especially since for the price we’d have liked to have used the onboard storage for a Spotify playlist or a podcast so we can leave our phone at home.


Fitbit Charge 5

(Image credit: Lloyd Coombes)
A good-looking fitness tracker – with a few compromises

Specifications

Battery life: Around seven days
GPS: Yes
Water resistance: 5 ATM
Display: 0.86" x 0.58" x 1.04" (AMOLED)

Reasons to buy

+
Low-profile design
+
Plenty of sensors 

Reasons to avoid

-
Small display
-
No media playback 

The Charge 5 looks like a modern version of the classic Fitbit design, and for many people that will be enough. Its display is bright, its strap is comfortable and it has an array of sensors you may not know you need – including an ECG and EDA for measuring atrial fibrillation and stress respectively.

All of that is in a slimline design that offers a gorgeous display, although the column-based user interface may take some adjustment for new users.

Still, if you’re looking to track a run, a hike, a bike ride or even a swim, you could do much worse than the Fitbit Charge 5. It also includes six months of Fitbit Premium.


Image of Fitbit Versa 3 during testing

(Image credit: Future/Lloyd Coombes)
Best all-rounder in the Fitbit line-up

Specifications

Battery: Around six days
GPS: Yes
Water resistance: 5ATM
Display: 1.58" AMOLED

Reasons to buy

+
Looks great
+
Attractive price 

Reasons to avoid

-
No EDA scan

In many ways, the Fitbit Versa 3 is tricky to separate from the Sense, as both have an almost identical design. That makes for a lot of the same positives, but likewise goes for the negatives.

There’s that excellent display, comfortable feel, and impressive battery life, but there’s no music playback. And yet, the Versa 3 may emerge victorious when choosing between them because it’s significantly cheaper than the Sense.

The tradeoff is in the stress-tracking EDA scan. You won’t find it in the Versa 3, but if you’re not likely to use it then we’d recommend saving money and plumping for the Versa 3. Instead, the Versa 3 will track stress through other data-collection methods, such as a brief questionnaire or by analyzing heart rate. Six months of Fitbit Premium are included.


Image of Fitbit Luxe

(Image credit: Future/Lloyd Coombes)
The smallest Fitbit

Specifications

Battery: Around five days
GPS: No
Water resistance: 50ATM
Display: 0.76" AMOLED

Reasons to buy

+
Compact design
+
Bright AMOLED display 

Reasons to avoid

-
Small screen won’t be for everyone
-
No GPS 

The Fitbit Luxe is a more premium counterpart to the Inspire and is possibly the most fashion-conscious tracker in the range.

It’s small and thin, so much so it’s easy to forget it’s on your wrist. It offers six days of battery and while the smaller display will take some getting used to, it’s bright enough to be legible in sunlight.

You’ll also find the excellent sleep, heart rate, distance, and calorie tracking you’ve come to expect from Fitbit, though it’s wrapped up in a slender, more jewelry-like design.

There’s no GPS, so you’ll want to take a phone with you if you’re planning to track workout routes while out. You get six months of Fitbit Premium, too.


Fitbit Inspire 2 on person's wrist

(Image credit: Lloyd Coombes)
The cheapest Fitbit

Specifications

Battery: Up to 10 days
GPS: Yes
Water resistance: 5ATM
Display: 1.4" OLED (black and white)

Reasons to buy

+
Affordable
+
Small
+
Long battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Black-and-white display
-
No GPS

Looking for your first fitness tracker? You may have found it with the Fitbit Inspire 2. This small, inexpensive tracker is ideal for monitoring heart rate, steps and calories burned to get you started on your fitness journey.

The display is small but it's also black and white, meaning those with impaired vision may have difficulty using it. If you are able to work with it, though, the 10-day battery life means you won’t need to charge it often – and that includes excellent sleep tracking.

Mind you, if you’re looking to shave time off your running route you’ll want to take your phone with you since there’s no GPS tracking. What you do get, though, is a year of Fitbit Premium.


How we test Fitbit watches

Why you can trust Live Science Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

We tested the Fitbit range for overall aesthetics and everyday features like smartphone compatibility, music streaming, and maps, assessing each model step by step (quite literally) as they racked up a star rating out of five. Other key features like battery life, water resistance, and GPS all underwent assessment, and we also put the health and fitness tracker capabilities to work, noting available exercise data like heart rate and stress tracking. We included any additional design perks, like access to third-party apps, before rating each Fitbit for value for money – allowing you to make a well-informed decision on your wearables.

Lloyd Coombes freelance tech and fitness writer for Live Science. He's an expert in all things Apple as well as in computer and gaming tech, with previous works published on TopTenReviews, Space.com, and TechRadar. You'll find him regularly testing the latest MacBook or iPhone, but he spends most of his time writing about video games at Dexerto.com. He also covers board games and virtual reality, just to round out the nerdy pursuits.