No Descendants Are Left from the First Eskimos
Grass-Covered Midden in Greenland
August 28th, 2014
A new study of human DNA -- and the largest genetics study yet of ancient peoples -- reveals that the Paleo-Eskimos are genetically distinct from both the Neo-Eskimos and modern Native Americans.
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Alexander the Great-Era Tomb Will Soon Reveal Its Secrets
sphinxes
August 26th, 2014
As archaeologists continue to clear dirt and stone slabs from the entrance of a huge tomb in Greece, excitement is building over what excavators may find inside.
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World's Oldest Wine Cellar Fueled Palatial Parties
Wine jugs in situ
August 27th, 2014
An archaeological excavation at a Bronze Age palace in modern-day Israel revealed an astonishingly intact ancient wine cellar. A chemical analysis of residue from the jars showed that the wine had traces of pine resin, honey, mint and juniper.
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Real Paleo Diet: Ancient Humans Ate Snails
paleolithic snails
August 20th, 2014
Paleolithic early humans in Spain ate snails nearly 30,000 years ago, about 10,000 years earlier than other humans in the Mediterranean.
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Ancient Arabian Stones Hint at How Humans Migrated Out of Africa
Ancient Homo Skull
August 26th, 2014
Ancient stone artifacts recently excavated from Saudi Arabia possess similarities to items of about the same age in Africa — a discovery that could provide clues to how humans dispersed out of Africa, researchers say.
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Oldest Metal Object in Middle East Discovered in Woman's Grave
A copper awl was discovered at the archaeological site Tel Tsaf in the Jordan Valley of Israel, dating to 5100 B.C. to 4600 B.C.
August 22nd, 2014
A copper awl dating to between 5100 and 4600 B.C. reveals metals were exchanged across hundreds of miles in the southern Levant more than 6,000 years ago, centuries earlier than previously thought, researchers say.
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Humans Did Not Wipe Out the Neanderthals, New Research Suggests
Neanderthal face
August 20th, 2014
Neanderthals went extinct in Europe about 40,000 years ago, giving them millennia to coexist with modern humans culturally and sexually, according to new research that also suggests modern humans didn't cause Neanderthals to die out rapidly.
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