Egyptian Carving Defaced by King Tut's Possible Father Discovered
Egypt archaeology, Egyptian carving
July 24th, 2014
The 3,300-year-old carving once held the face of the god Amun, but pharaoh Akhenaten, who may have been King Tut's dad, had it and the associated hieroglyphs hacked out during a religious revolution.
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Tonga May Have Been a Vast Seafaring Empire
Tonga tomb of kings
July 23rd, 2014
The seafaring empire of Tonga, an archipelago of about 160 Polynesian Islands in the South Pacific Ocean, once spanned more than a thousand miles, serving as the hub through which distant settlements exchanged artifacts and ideas, researchers say.
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Going West Wasn't So Deadly for Early Mormon Pioneers
Early Mormon Pioneers
July 16th, 2014
Pioneers had plenty to worry about on their journeys west, but the earliest Mormons survived their treks across the Great Plains in high numbers, new research finds. The mortality rate of Mormon pioneers was barely higher than average.
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Got Cavities? Ancient Teeth Reveal Bacteria's Evolution
A researcher collects a sample from an ancient human tooth in search of the bacteria that cause cavities and tooth decay.
July 23rd, 2014
The bacteria that cause many cavities has been diversifying over the last several thousand years, according to a new study of DNA extracted from ancient, cavity-ridden teeth.
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Clay Tokens Used As 'Contracts' Even After Invention of Writing
Ancient Clay Tokens Used for Record-Keeping
July 16th, 2014
Thousands of years after the invention of a formal writing system, a new study finds that the ancient people of the Middle East may have continued to use a more primitive way of recording information: clay tokens.
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Medieval Italian Skeleton's Surprising Diagnosis: Livestock Disease
A skeleton shows signs of brucellosis.
July 15th, 2014
An Italian skeleton from the middle ages gets a diagnosis 700 years too late: The man had brucellosis, a livestock-transmitted disease that causes pain and reoccurring fevers, and, occasionally, death.
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100,000-Year-Old Case of Brain Damage Discovered
paleolithic child skull reconstruction
July 23rd, 2014
The skeleton of a child who lived 100,000 years ago shows signs of severe brain damage from a head trauma, new research suggests.
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Tooth Tales: Prehistoric Plaque Reveals Early Humans Ate Weeds
Ancient Skeleton Found in Central Sudan
July 16th, 2014
When looking for a meal, prehistoric people in Africa munched on the tuberous roots of weeds such as the purple nutsedge, according to a new study of hardened plaque on samples of ancient teeth.
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Ancient Priest's Tomb Painting Discovered Near Great Pyramid at Giza
 A painting discovered in the tomb of a priest
July 15th, 2014
Scenes of life, including that of an ancient priest and his dog, come to life in this wall painting on fine white plaster found in ancient Egypt just east of the Great Pyramid. The researchers suspect other tomb paintings await discovery.
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