'Longitude' Prize Will Tackle Antibiotic Resistance
John Harrison, problem of longitude
July 30th, 2014
The British public voted for the £10m Longitude Prize to go towards funding scientific research to solve the urgent global problem of rising resistance to antibiotics.
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King Richard III's Hasty Grave Opened to the Public
The original hastily dug grave of Richard III of England (shown here) can now be viewed by the public at a visitor center for the king in Leicester, England.
July 28th, 2014
The public can now visit the first, but not final, resting place of King Richard III of England. The king's bones were found in 2012 in a parking lot in Leicester, England.
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Long-Lost Anchor May Soon Give up Its Secrets
A photo of the anchor pulled from the Puget Sound
July 24th, 2014
A rusty, barnacle-covered anchor that may be the lost anchor from an 18th century voyage around the world was pulled from the Puget Sound last month. Now, the sunken treasure will undergo a long cleaning.
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100,000-Year-Old Case of Brain Damage Discovered
paleolithic child skull reconstruction
July 23rd, 2014
The skeleton of a child who lived 100,000 years ago shows signs of severe brain damage from a head trauma, new research suggests.
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Tooth Tales: Prehistoric Plaque Reveals Early Humans Ate Weeds
Ancient Skeleton Found in Central Sudan
July 16th, 2014
When looking for a meal, prehistoric people in Africa munched on the tuberous roots of weeds such as the purple nutsedge, according to a new study of hardened plaque on samples of ancient teeth.
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Egyptian Carving Defaced by King Tut's Possible Father Discovered
Egypt archaeology, Egyptian carving
July 24th, 2014
The 3,300-year-old carving once held the face of the god Amun, but pharaoh Akhenaten, who may have been King Tut's dad, had it and the associated hieroglyphs hacked out during a religious revolution.
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Tonga May Have Been a Vast Seafaring Empire
Tonga tomb of kings
July 23rd, 2014
The seafaring empire of Tonga, an archipelago of about 160 Polynesian Islands in the South Pacific Ocean, once spanned more than a thousand miles, serving as the hub through which distant settlements exchanged artifacts and ideas, researchers say.
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