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In Photos: Frozen Lakes in Winter

Collateral damage

frozen lake science

(Image credit: Ted Ozersky)

A boat is frozen into the ice covering the western shore of Lake Baikal near Bolshiye Koty, a rural location in Irkutsk Oblast, Russia.

Collecting specimens

frozen lake science

(Image credit: Ted Ozersky)

In Burntside Lake, Minnesota, Kirill Shchapov, a doctoral candidate in biology at the University of Minnesota in Duluth, conducts a zooplankton tow, collecting the microscopic creatures by dragging a fine mesh net through the water.

Playtime

frozen lake science

(Image credit: Mike McKay)

In northern Lake Michigan in January 2013, the Coast Guard icebreaker U.S.C.G.S Mackinaw is "hove-to" — in a stationary position facing the wind — during "ice liberty," a period when the crew is permitted to disembark and climb the ice.

Breathtaking allure

frozen lake science

(Image credit: Nigel D'souza)

Lake Erie in February 2011.

Ice jewels

frozen lake science

(Image credit: japicoa)

Ice on Lake Baikal, Russia. The lake's water is so clear that it appears blue when it freezes.

Suspended particles

frozen lake science

(Image credit: Mike McKay)

This image of frozen Lake Winnipeg in Manitoba, Canada was taken during a February 2014 snowmobile survey. The ice ridges contain particulate matter, much of which were colonies of diatoms, a type of algae.

Ice work

frozen lake science

(Image credit: Ted Ozersky)

Field work on Minnesota's La Salle Lake. At 213 feet (65 meters) in depth it is the second-deepest lake in the state.

More samples

frozen lake science

(Image credit: Marina Haldna)

In March 2015, researchers gathered samples from Lake Lämmijärv, part of Lake Peipus on the boundary between Estonia and Russia.

Ice melt

frozen lake science

(Image credit: Gesa Weyhenmeyer)

Ice melt at Lake Mälaren, Sweden. Mälaren is the third largest lake in Sweden, with a surface area of approximately 440 square miles (1,140 square kilometers).

Tech and samples

frozen lake science

(Image credit: J. Jolley)

At West Long Lake, Nebraska in the Valentine National Wildlife Refuge, in January 2008, a researcher uses an integrated water column sampler to collect samples for processing.