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Hypervolt 2 review

With a Bluetooth connected app, the Hypervolt 2 takes your massage to the next level

Hypervolt 2 massage gun
(Image: © Hyperice)

Live Science Verdict

The Hypervolt 2 combines a powerful performance with a helpful app, to help you target your massage techniques and get the best results.

Pros

  • +

    Five attachment heads

  • +

    Powerful performance

  • +

    Bluetooth connected app

Cons

  • -

    No carry case for massage gun

  • -

    Pressure indicator can be hard to see

  • -

    Noisier than some massage guns

In our Hypervolt 2 review, we check out this electric percussion massage gun that promises to relieve muscle tension and pain in the comfort of your own home. We’ll be giving you the lowdown on its features and performance, as well as checking out the latest user reviews from people who have purchased the Hypervolt 2. 

Hyperice says the Hypervolt 2 is lighter, more powerful, and more ergonomically designed than the original Hypervolt massage gun. What’s more, it’s Bluetooth-enabled, so it connects with the Hyperice app to offer automated speed control and expert video tutorials on the best massage techniques for specific areas of the body. 

Easy to operate and control, and with a range of head attachments that come in an attractive black zip-up pouch, the Hypervolt 2 massage gun is designed to work away knots and tension, ease fatigue, optimize your workouts, and fit into your everyday routine. But does it succeed? We put it to the test. 

And if the Hypervolt 2 isn’t the massage gun you’re looking for, our guide to the best massage guns has lots more options for the perfect fit. 

Hypervolt 2 review: size and design

The Hypervolt 2 comes in a recyclable cardboard box. Inside is the massage gun, and a black travel pouch containing  five head attachments that can be attached to the head of the massage gun:

  • Fork: For longer muscles such as calves, forearms, biceps, and ankles.
  • Ball: For sore muscles and a great starter attachment for larger muscle areas.
  • Cushion: For sensitive areas, such as wrists, ankles, knees, traps, and around the neck.
  • Flat: For larger surface areas, such as quads, hamstrings, back, and chest.
  • Bullet:  For targeting trigger points in glutes, hips, traps, shoulders, and other complex muscle groups.

hypervolt 2 massage gun size and design

(Image credit: Joanne Lewsley)

This is three more attachments than users get with the cheaper Hypervolt Go, which contains just two head attachments - the flat and bullet attachments. 

The box also contains an 18v charger which, like the Hypervolt Go, includes four plug adaptors for use when travelling, and a series of ‘Quick start’ cards explaining how to download the connected Hyperice app, how to power up the Hypervolt 2, and caring for the massage gun. Users will need to power up the device for up to four hours before their first use. A charging indicator ring flashes red and then orange while the device is charging, changing to green when it is fully charged.  We found the device was fully charged within a couple of hours. 

The battery is designed to last for three hours after a full charge. We didn’t have the time to fully test this, but can say that we used the massage gun for at least an hour and there was no negative impact on speed or performance. 

The Hypervolt 2 is larger than the Hypervolt Go, but only a little heavier, at 1.8lbs. The ergonomic handle is easy to grasp and move the massage gun around the body. The gun itself is a sleek gray, around the same size as a small hairdryer, though not quite as compact as the Hypervolt Go. 

At the back of the massage gun there are three tiny lights around the edge that indicate speed settings, and a further three dots of light under the power button. These indicate pressure, with more lights activated when more pressure is applied. These can be very helpful when the gun is in operation on your legs and arms, but not so great when you use it on your back, as they’re impossible to see. 

Hypervolt 2 review: functionality

As with other Hypervolt devices, users can download and connect to the Hyperice app, choosing their specific device. You can select the sports you do most frequently and get specific massage routines to suit. The Hyperice app can also connect with other apps, such as Strava and Garmin, though you can skip this step. Everything is editable in the ‘Profile’ area of the app, so you can add more sports as you take them up.

There are plenty of routines to follow in the app, from short ones that focus on relieving desk tension or massaging the feet, to longer sessions that target the whole body with a full deep tissue massage. It is also possible to select muscle groups within the app to find routines that target specific areas, such as a shoulder glide routine. The app also features expert videos with tips on lifestyle and general health, improving form during physical exercise, and recovering from sports-related injuries.

Users can power on the Hypervolt 2 by holding down the power button down for a couple of seconds. This button also allows users to toggle between the three speed settings.

It’s easy to add the head attachments too, by simply clicking them firmly into the opening of the massage gun. 

Hypervolt 2 review: performance

First, we tested the volume of the Hypervolt 2 during use. The gun comes with three speed settings, each measured in percussions per minute (PPM). This measures how many times the device pulses in 60 seconds:

  • Level 1: 2200
  • Level 2: 2750
  • Level 3: 3200 

hypervolt 2 being turned on

(Image credit: Joanne Lewsley)

At level 1, using the flat head attachment, the gun clocked in at 55 decibels. Level 2 was 58 decibels and level 3  was around 60 decibels. These are all around the same level as normal conversation, or the hum of a nearby air conditioner. Not quite the same as the ‘almost silent’ operation the manufacturer claims on the packaging. 

One great advantage of the Hypervolt 2 is its Bluetooth connectivity. This opens up the Hyperice app much more to users than the Hypervolt Go. By connecting the massage gun via the app, users can follow video tutorials and routines in real time, as the massage gun automatically speeds up and slows down in line with the video, and powers off at the end. 

We tested a couple of routines using the app - both the ‘Back pain’ and ‘Tight calf relief’ videos. During both routines, the massage gun altered speeds automatically and stopped when the video ended. It’s easy to pair the device too - although it needs to be operating when you pair it, otherwise it can’t be found by the app. 

Tutorials were fun and easy to follow, and it was clear how much the device was pummeling into areas of tension, without causing pain or discomfort. The cushion head attachment was particularly good for tender areas around the neck and shoulders after long hours sitting at a desk. 

man using hypervolt 2 on his leg

(Image credit: Hyperice)

Hypervolt 2 review: what’s good about it?

We were impressed by the connectivity with the Hyperice app. Unlike the Hypervolt Go, the Hypervolt 2 directly connects with the app, changing speeds in line with the videos and powering down at the end of tutorials automatically. 

We also liked the simplicity of using the Hypervolt 2. It’s easy to use and operate almost straight out of the box, and adding and removing attachments couldn’t be easier or quicker.

Finally, we rated the effects of the Hypervolt 2. After just a handful of short massages targeting specific areas, including the calves and the back, we felt refreshed and relaxed. It really does get down into those aching muscles and gives you a pleasant lift. 

Hypervolt 2 review: what’s not so good about it?

It’s hard to find fault with the Hypervolt 2. One drawback is the fact that the pressure indicator is at the rear of the gun, so it’s hard to see it when you’re working on areas around the back, or back of the neck.  

One thing that’s missing is a carry case that houses both the massage gun and all the attachments that come with it, rather than just the attachments. 

It could also do with being a little quieter during operation. At its highest setting, it could become annoying for people with sensitive hearing.

Hypervolt 2 review: User reviews

The Hypervolt 2 gets five stars on Amazon from 87% of users. They rate its ability to ease muscle tension and back pain, as well as its ease of use. Many users swear by the Hypervolt 2 for helping them to sleep better at night too. Lots of users report that a massage therapist, physical therapist, or chiropractor recommended the Hypervolt 2, giving it extra professional cachet. 

Negative reviews are few and far between. However, some users complain that it’s a little cumbersome to hold if you have small hands, and others say it can be tricky to work out how to turn it on at first. 

Hypervolt 2 charging

(Image credit: Hyperice)

Should you buy the Hypervolt 2?

If you’re after an effective, easy-to-use percussion massage gun that won’t break the bank, but will give you a powerful massage in the comfort of your own home, the Hypervolt 2  is a great buy. 

It’s simple to operate, relatively affordable in comparison to some other brands, and the connected app makes it easy to target specific areas of tension. 

It’s an ideal size to transport to work or the gym, and is even approved for carry-on luggage, so you can take it travelling too. Perfect for easing aches and pains on a long haul flight.

If this product isn’t for you

If you like Hyperice devices, but you want a smaller massage gun, then why not try the Hypervolt Go? It also comes with two attachments, and is lighter and smaller than the Hypervolt 2.

If you’d like a massage gun that you can match to your gym kit, the Recovapro Lite comes in a range of fun colors, such as pink, silver, black and blue. It also comes with four attachments and an attractive carry case.

If you’re after a professional piece of kit, the HoMedics Pro Physio comes with no less than six massage heads. Plus, its heated head feature delivers extra tension-easing warmth, straight to those areas of fatigue.

Joanne Lewsley is a UK-based freelance writer and editor, covering health and lifestyle news and features. She mainly creates evidence-based health and parenting content and has worked with a number of global sites, including BabyCentre UK, Medical News Today, Fit & Well, Top Ten Reviews, and Yahoo!