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In Images: 2012 Nikon Small World Contest Winners

Holiday lights

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Jennifer L. Peters & Dr. Michael R. Taylor, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital | St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital)

The blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo captured using the Confocal technique at 20 times magnification.

Adorable arachnids

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Walter Piorowski)

Live newborn lynx spiderlings shot using Reflected Light, Figer Optics and Image Stacking Techniques at six times magnification.

Up close and personal

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Dr. Dylan Burnette | National Institutes of Health)

Human bone cancer (osteosarcoma) showing actin filaments (purple), mitochondria (yellow), and DNA (blue) captured with the Structured Illumination Microsopy (SIM) technique at 63 times magnification.

In development

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Dr. W. Ryan Williamson | Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI))

Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) visual system halfway through pupal development, showing retina (gold), photoreceptor axons (blue), and brain (green) imaged using the Confocal technique at 1500 times magnification.

Sparkling fluff

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Honorio Cócera-La Parra | University of Valencia Museum of Geology, Department of Geology)

Cacoxenite (mineral) from La Paloma Mine, Spain in the Transmitted Light technique at 18 times magnification.

Coming in for a landing

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Marek Mis | Marek Mis Photography)

Cosmarium sp. (desmid) near a Sphagnum sp. leaf in the Polarized Light technique at 100 times magnification.

Heart-shaped

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Dr. Michael John Bridge | University of Utah HSC Core Research Facilities - Cell Imaging Lab)

Eye organ of a Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) third-instar larvae pictured in the Confocal technique at 60 times magnification.

Hairy legs

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Gerd A. Guenther)

Pleurobrachia sp. (sea gooseberry) larva in the Differential Interference Contrast technique at 500 times magnification.

Family time

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Geir Drange.)

Myrmica sp. (ant) carrying its larva captured using Reflected Light and Image Stacking Techniques at five times magnification.

Spiny stars

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Dr. Alvaro Migotto | University of São Paulo Centro de Biologia Marinha)

A brittle star imaged using Stereomicroscopy and Darkfield techniques at eight times magnification.

Electric lights

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Jessica Von Stetina | Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research)

Single optical section through the tip of the gut of a Drosophila melanogaster larva expressing a reporter for Notch signaling pathway activity (green), and stained with cytoskeletal (red) and nuclear (blue) markers captured using the Confocal technique at 25 times magnification.