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In Images: 2012 Nikon Small World Contest Winners

Tiny sun

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Esra Guc | École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL))

3D lymphangiogenesis assay. Cells sprout from dextran beads embedded in fibrin gel using the Fluorescence and Confocal techniques at 200 times magnification.

Miniscule worlds

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Dr. Diana Lipscomb | George Washington University Department of Biological Sciences)

Sonderia sp. (a ciliate that preys upon various algae, diatoms, and cyanobacteria) pictured using the Nomarski Interference Contrast technique at 400 times magnification.

Tons of teeth

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: José R. Almodóvar Rivera | University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez Campus, Biology Department)

Pistil of Adenium obesum using the Image Stacking technique at 10 times magnification.

Waving colors

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Andrea Genre | University of Turin Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology)

Section of a Coccinella (ladybug) leg captured using the Confocal technique at 10 times magnification.

Swirls and twirls

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Douglas Moore | University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point University Relations & Communications/Geology)

Fossilized Turitella agate containing Elimia tenera (freshwater snails) and ostracods (seed shrimp) captured using Stereomicroscopy at seven times magnification.

Dangerous points

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Chrles Krebs | Chrles Krebs Photography)

Stinging nettle trichome on leaf vein using the Transmitted Light technique and 100 times magnification.

Graffiti on the beach

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Dr. David Maitland | www.davidmaitland.com)

Coral sand using the Brightfield technique at 100 times magnification.

See, hear and speak no evil ...

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Dorit Hockman | University of Cambridge)

Embryos of the species Molossus rufus (black mastiff bat) captured using the Brightfield technique.

Colorful bunch

2012 Nikon Small world competition

(Image credit: Dr. Somayeh Naghiloo | University of Tabriz Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences)

Floral primordia of Allium sativum (garlic) captured with the Epi-Illumiation technique.

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