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Oldest Viking settlement possibly unearthed in Iceland

The oldest of the two Viking longhouses at Stöð dates from around A.D. 800, several decades before the commonly accepted date of the settlement of Iceland in A.D. 874.
The oldest of the two Viking longhouses at Stöð dates from around A.D. 800, several decades before the commonly accepted date of the settlement of Iceland in A.D. 874.
(Image: © Bjarni Einarsson)

Archaeologists have unearthed what may be the oldest Viking settlement in Iceland.

The ancient longhouse is thought to be a summer settlement built in the 800s, decades before seafaring refugees are supposed to have settled the island, and was hidden beneath a younger longhouse brimming with treasures, said archaeologist Bjarni Einarsson, who led the excavations.

"The younger hall is the richest in Iceland so far," Einarsson told Live Science. "It is hard not to conclude that it is a chieftain's house."

Related: Photos: Viking outposts possibly found in Canada

Communal houses

The youngest of the two longhouses contained the most valuable horde of objects ever found in Iceland and was probably the hall of a Viking chieftain.

The youngest of the two longhouses contained the most valuable horde of objects ever found in Iceland and was probably the hall of a Viking chieftain. (Image credit: Bjarni Einarsson)

Longhouses were large wooden halls, up to 250 feet (75 meters) long and 20 feet (6 meters) wide, covered with turf and thatch and used as communal habitations throughout the Norse lands during the Viking Age

They were divided into rooms and could be shared by several families. Fires were built in stone hearths along the center, and farm animals could be stabled there to protect them from cold.

Both longhouses were found at Stöð, near the village and fjord of Stöðvarfjörður in the east of Iceland. The younger structure dates to around A.D. 874 — the commonly accepted date for Iceland's settlement by people, who, according to Icelandic lore, were escaping the Norwegian king Harald Fairhair. It contains one of the most valuable hoards of ornamental beads, silver and ancient coins ever found in Scandinavia, Einarsson said. 

Related: Fierce fighters: 7 secrets of Viking seamen

Among the finds: Roman and Middle Eastern silver coins, and "hacksilver," which are cut and bent pieces of silver used as bullion or currency by the Vikings and other ancient peoples.

The excavations of the 130 foot-long (40 m) hall have also unearthed decorative glass beads, rings, weights and a tiny fragment of gold, Einarsson said. The inhabitants likely acquired these goods by trading local resources, such as the skins and meat from whales and seals, which were prized throughout Viking Scandinavia.

As well as Roman and Middle Eastern coins and pieces of silver, the excavations unearthed many decorative glass beads and a large sandstone bead that were probably used for trading.

As well as Roman and Middle Eastern coins and pieces of silver, the excavations unearthed many decorative glass beads and a large sandstone bead that were probably used for trading. (Image credit: Bjarni Einarsson)

Atlantic expansion

Hidden beneath the treasure-filled longhouse was an even older structure. Chemical and other analysis suggest this buried longhouse was built in the 800s, long before the permanent settlement of Iceland, Einarsson said.

He thinks it was a seasonal settlement or camp, occupied only during the summer and maybe into the fall, by workers in the area.

Although walruses were not found in eastern Iceland, the local resources that could be eaten, preserved or traded could have included produce from fish, whales, seals and birds, he said.

The archaeologists have also found artifacts from the everyday life of the settlement, including several spindle whorls made of local sandstone that were used for spinning fibers into thread or twine.

The archaeologists have also found artifacts from the everyday life of the settlement, including several spindle whorls made of local sandstone that were used for spinning fibers into thread or twine. (Image credit: Bjarni Einarsson)

Parts of the older building investigated so far show it was one of the largest longhouses ever found in Iceland.

"We know that the westernmost part of the older hall was a smithy [for working with metal] — the only smithy within a hall known in Iceland," Einarsson said.

The seasonal camp at Stöð was similar in scale and function to the Viking settlement discovered at L'Anse aux Meadows, in what is now Newfoundland in Canada, which has been dated to around A.D. 1000, he said.

"This was a pattern of the settlement of the islands in the Atlantic Ocean," Einarsson said. "First, we had the seasonal camps, and then the settlement followed."

Einarsson has directed a private archaeological firm for more than 20 years, and from 2009 excavated a Viking Age settlement at Vogur, on Iceland's west coast, which depended on hunting walruses for their ivory, skins and meat.

He discovered the longhouse ruins at Stöð in 2007 and began excavations at the site in 2015. The project is paid for by Iceland's Archaeological Fund, the region's municipal government, companies and local people.

Originally published on Live Science.

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  • philip_rhoades
    I have been complaining to LS for years about the use of Imperial Measurements in articles instead of the SI measurements that should be used - with no response - it is hard to understand how a supposedly "Scientific" journal feels it has to cater scientifically illiterate Yankees . .

    Anyway, this post is about a related matter - the frequent use of bad / incorrect English in the articles - for example - does the title of this article mean that the writer is not sure if the settlement was unearthed or not? - I am guessing he is trying to say that it is possibly the oldest Viking settlement found so far . .
    Reply
  • S at Cumae
    Talking of 'illiterate' and 'the use of bad/incorrect English': it is 'cater for'.
    In response to your pompous rudeness: I am by no means scientifically illiterate; however, I have no problem using Imperial measurements - neither do my older scientific friends. The Americans have achieved so much in the field of technology and science using Imperial measurements, therefore it is respectful and convenient for many people to use their terms. I have enormous respect for America and am fed up with brainwashed fools attacking them.
    Furthermore, I have no problem understanding the title. Is it not some lacking on your part or perhaps manic nit-picking?
    Why not vent your asinine spleen somewhere else?
    Reply
  • philip_rhoades
    S at Cumae said:
    In response to your pompous rudeness: I am by no means scientifically illiterate; however, I have no problem using Imperial measurements - neither do my older scientific friends. The Americans have achieved so much in the field of technology and science using Imperial measurements, therefore it is respectful and convenient for many people to use their terms. I have enormous respect for America and am fed up with brainwashed fools attacking them.
    Furthermore, I have no problem understanding the title. Is it not some lacking on your part or perhaps manic nit-picking?
    Why not vent your asinine spleen somewhere else?

    Yes, Yankees are very clever:

    1. Look at the COVID-19 per capita rates by country . . and then develop a metric that also takes into account wealth per capita . . very clever medical management . .

    2. The US Military-Industrial-Intelligence-Financial Complex virtually guarantees that The World's Sixt Mass Exintction will accelerate to its inevitable conclusion in the near term . . also extremely clever . .

    3. The US is basically a "Failed State" in terms of looking after its population - marvellously clever . .
    Reply
  • Edd
    Guess you are not so clever, since nothing has changed.

    And by the way, you're welcome having saved your country in WW I and WW II.
    Reply
  • 999th Gec
    you know Russia did most of the heavy lifting in WW2 right? have you studied international ww2 history? The US didn't really care until pearl harbor. And then we committed two atrocities that have never been repeated.
    Reply
  • LowellFreeman
    Was wondering what interesting or prophetic comments I might find on the subject of Viking settlements and found flame wars over units of measure and grammar. Gotta love the internet.
    Reply