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Phone or iPod Run New Pocket-size Projector

Phone accessory powered by Explay's nano-projector engine. (Image credit: Business Wire)

The Explay nano-projector engine, a matchbook-sized projector, has been successfully tested. Science fiction Grandmaster Jack Vance would be pleased.

"A key requirement for a nano-projector is high brightness at low power consumption. We have engineered the display pixel technology to increase the effective optical aperture and transmission, which significantly increases optical efficiency. We believe our proprietary compact, highly transmissive microdisplay combined with a unique optical engine technology from Explay should enable an ultra-compact nano-projector." (Explay Matchbox-Size Nano-Projector Engine for Mobile Applications)

Ifness drew from his pocket a tube of dull black metal an inch in diameter, four inches long. Along the flattened top a number of knobs caught the light and glittered in Ifness' hand. He made an adjustment, pointed the tube at the wall beside Etzwane, and projected a cone of light. Etzwane had never seen a photograph so detailed. He glimpsed several views of the Corporation Plaza, then Ifness made new adjustments, sending a thousand images flickering against the wall. (Read more about Jack Vance's pocket display projector)

I love this small ExPlay projector: when can I have one for my camera (to show pictures immediately), for my daughter's iPod (that's one tiny screen—if I paid for the video content with allowance money, I should get to see it, right?) and for other stuff I haven't even thought of yet. No word yet on when this prototype device will be available for the consumer market.

For other science-fictional display technologies that are now real, take a look at the Heliodisplay midair projector and the True 3D Plasma dispay (with real plasma!). Thanks to Dom for sending the tip for this item along with a quote and citation. Read a bit more about this device at ExPlay.

(This Science Fiction in the News story used with permission from Technovelgy.com

Bill Christensen catalogues the inventions, technology and ideas of science fiction writers at his website, Technovelgy. He is a contributor to Live Science.