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In Photos: Ancient Seaside Portico Uncovered in Greece

Ancient Argilos

(Image credit: Jacques Perreault, Université de Montréal)

During excavations in the summer of 2013, archaeologists uncovered the portico of the ancient city of Argilos, which sits along the northern coast of the Aegean Sea in modern-day Greece. This aerial view shows the ruins that were excavated, including five of the seven storerooms that make up the portico.

Nearly 2,700 Years Old

(Image credit: Jacques Perreault, Université de Montréal)

Argilos was founded around 655 B.C. and reached its peak in the 5th century. It was overshadowed by the foundation of Amphipolis, an Athenian outpost, and then left to ruin after it was conquered by Philip II of Macedon in 357 B.C.

Amphora

(Image credit: Jacques Perreault, Université de Montréal)

The city was abandoned in the 4th century B.C., making it like a time capsule for ancient life in northwestern Greece. Among the artifacts found inside the portico at Argilos were ancient Greek ceramic vessels, such as this amphora.

Acropolis

(Image credit: Jacques Perreault, Université de Montréal)

This aerial view shows where the portico was located in relation to the acropolis of Argilos, at the top of the hill.

Portico Puzzle

(Image credit: Jacques Perreault, Université de Montréal)

Excavators attempt to put together tile fragments like a puzzle piece inside one of the portico's storerooms. Archaeologists at the site say each room was designed using different construction techniques and masonry, indicating the shop owners, not one city-sponsored architect, were responsible for building the rooms

Ancient Vase

(Image credit: Jacques Perreault, Université de Montréal)

A painted Greek krater, used to mix wine and water, from the 4th century B.C.

Ancient Currency

(Image credit: Jacques Perreault, Université de Montréal)

Archaeologists found ancient coins found at Argilos.