A breast-screening smart bra developed by the Centre for Materials Research & Innovation (University of Bolton, UK) allows users to detect breast cancer at the earliest possible stage, making a cure much more likely.

The smart bra uses a microwave antennae device built into the structure of the bra. Data about each breast is collected by embedded microchips which generate computer-generated images. Professor Elias Siores, director of CRMI, said: "The breast screening smart bra is an invention that allows users to detect breast cancer at a curable stage. It is a low-risk, non-invasive, simple-to-use and cost-effective device that can provide easily-interpreted data."

The smart bra is merely the latest development in health-enhancing electronic clothing. The MEMSwear fall-detecting smart shirt uses built-in motion-detection hardware to detect if the user has fallen (and can't get up).

Philips Research in Germany has developed underwear that monitors your heart; sensors are woven into the fabric to detect heart rate.

The electronic underwear from Philips Research takes monitoring a step further. Not only can the prototype gather information about your health, it can even dial 911 if it detects a problem. Hopefully, future iterations of the smart bra would be able to make an appointment with your oncologist.

Science fiction fans may recall the fictional heartshirt from Rudy Rucker's 1988 novel "Wetware;" it could monitor its wearer's heart rate.

This device would also be much cheaper than providing every woman with a remote-controlled robotic hand that would perform a breast exam.

Via HPKC.

(This Science Fiction in the News story used with permission of Technovelgy.com - where science meets fiction.)