Skip to main content

Images: Uncovering the Colossal Dreadnoughtus Dinosaur

Big and Small

two dinosaurs

(Image credit: Mark A. Klingler | Carnegie Museum of Natural History)

The bones of a gargantuan long-necked dinosaur, as big as a two-story house and weighing as much as 12 elephants, were discovered in Patagonia. Here, an illustrator's rendering of two Dreadnoughtus schrani dinosaurs next to a small meat-eating dinosaur. With a 37-foot-long neck, a 30-foot tale and a weight of 65 tons, the dinosaur likely had to eat massive amounts of plants to fuel its body. [Read full story]

Big dig

Big dig

(Image credit: Kenneth Lacovara)

Lead researcher Kenneth Lacovara, an associate professor of paleontology and geology at Drexel University in Philadelphia, at the Dreadnoughtus site. [Read full story]

Heavy lifting

Heavy lifting

(Image credit: Kenneth Lacovara)

Between 2005 and 2009, researchers excavated the dinosaur bones (shown here in 2006), revealing 45 percent of dinosaur's total skeleton and about 70 percent of the bones in its body. [Read full story]

Large Dino

Large Dino

(Image credit: Kenneth Lacovara)

Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara relaxes next to 234 plaster jackets holding the dinosaur bones of his and his colleagues' big find. [Read full story]

Teaming together

Teaming together

(Image credit: Kenneth Lacovara)

Former Drexel students Jessica Battisto (left) and Alison Moyer (right) jacket a single neck vertebra from Dreadnoughtus. [Read full story]

Dino Drawing

Dino Drawing

(Image credit: Jennifer Hall)

An artist's representation of Dreadnoughtus schrani, a dinosaur researchers discovered in Patagonia in 2005. The enormous dinosaur lived some 77 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous, when Earth was warm and ice-free, dotted with flowering plants. [Read full story]

Tail of a tale

Tail of a tale

(Image credit: Kenneth Lacovara)

A portion of the 29-foot (8.7 meter) long tail of Dreadnoughtus schrani at the excavation site in Patagonia. [Read full story]

Towering tibia

Towering tibia

(Image credit: Kenneth Lacovara)

Lacovara sits next to the right tibia, or shinbone, of Dreadnoughtus. [Read full story]

Chevron spotlight

Chevron spotlight

(Image credit: Kenneth Lacovara)

These bones, called a chevron, are found at the bottom of the tail. The chevrons in Dreadnoughtus tail have a large surface for muscle attachment, suggesting that the tail was muscular and powerful. [Read full story]

Stormy skies

Stormy skies

(Image credit: Kenneth Lacovara)

The landscape of Patagonia in Southern Argentina where the group excavated the dinosaur. [Read full story]

3D imaging

3D Imaging

(Image credit: Drexel University)

Lacovara’s team scanned the bones in 3D using lasers and are making them available to both researchers and the public. Here, doctoral candidate Anna Jaworski works on the Dreadnoughtus femur. [Read full story]