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Image Gallery: Drawing Dinosaurs

Tyrannosaurus rex

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

With its 4-foot long mouth full of sharp 6-inch teeth, the carnivorous Tyrannosaurus rex could easily rip into its prey.

Tyrannosaurus rex

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

About 15 feet tall and 40 feet long, Tyrannosaurus rex, whose name means “king of the tyrant lizards,” is one of the largest known land predators to ever roam the Earth.

Gorgosaurus libratus

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

Like its larger relative, the Tyrannosaurus rex, the Gorgosaurus was carnivorous, with large curving teeth. It also roamed the western parts of Canada and the United States in the late Cretaceous, approximately 75 million years ago.

Zuniceratops christopheri

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

Named for paleontologist Doug Wolfe’s 8-year-old son, Christopher, who was the first to spot its bones, the Zuniceratops was an upper Cretaceous herbivore equipped with sturdy teeth that could chomp branches from trees.

Monolophosaurus

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

The Monolophosaurus, a carnivorous dinosaur that roamed China during the middle Jurassic (approximately 180-159 million years ago), grew as tall as a person and had a large bony crest on its head.

Acrocanthosaurus atokensis

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

The Acrocanthosaurus, a carnivore who roamed the United States and Canada around 115-105 million years ago, is noted for the spines running along its back. Scientists speculate these could have been used in communicating status or other social interactions, fat storage or temperature control.

Chasmosaurus russelli

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

The herbivorous Chasmosaurus, which inhabited Canada around 75 million years ago, had the characteristic frill of a ceratopsid, which scientist think could have been anything from a mating display to a way to regulate body temperature.

Stygimoloch spirifer

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

Scientists are unsure whether the spikes that decorated the rim of the herbivorous Stygimoloch’s head provided a way to recognize group members or served as a means of defense against predators.

"Morrison Plant Eaters"

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

Shown in the image above, left to right: Apatosaurus ajax, Seismosaurus hallorum, another Apatosaurus ajax and Stegosaurus armatus The Morrison Formation is a distinctive body of rock that is rich in fossils of dinosaurs that lived during the late Jurassic, like the Stegosaurus with its tall spikes and plates and the giant Seismosaurus and Apatosaurus, some of the largest land animals that ever lived.

Seismosaurus and Allosaurus

(Image credit: Photograph © Julius T. Csotonyi (csotonyi.com). Image used with permission.)

A group of Allosauruses, the most common large predator of the late Jurassic, attacks a seismosaurus, whose name means “earth-shaking lizard.”