Images: Missing Nazi Diary Resurfaces

Rediscovered Diary

(Image credit: Courtesy of Immigration and Customs Enforcement )

The long-missing diary of Nazi ideologue Alfred Rosenberg, a close confidant of Adolf Hitler, was discovered in 2013 after a federal investigation. In December 2013, the papers were turned over to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

Preserved Pages

(Image credit: Courtesy of Immigration and Customs Enforcement )

These are details of a page from the Rosenberg Diary. On Nov. 7, 2013, the diary was photographed and scanned at the Hagley Museum in Wilmington, Del., under Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement supervision.

Alfred Rosenberg

(Image credit: Public domain)

Rosenberg was a leading Nazi ideologue. It is hoped that his papers could shed light on how and why the Holocaust happened.

Rosenberg Diary

(Image credit: Courtesy of Immigration and Customs Enforcement )

The diary consists of about 400 pages and covers 1936 through 1944.

Long-Lost Letters

(Image credit: Courtesy of Immigration and Customs Enforcement )

The diary was seized at a home in upstate New York in April 2013. It was originally brought to the United States by German-born American lawyer Robert Kempner, who served as a prosecutor during the Nuremberg trials.