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Gallery: Vivid Science Visualizations

Cosmos Web

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Miguel Angel Aragon Calvo, Johns Hopkins University; Julieta Aguilera and Mark SubbaRao, Adler Planetarium)

The 2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge winners include this informational poster, which traces galaxies and dark matter throughout the universe.

In a Mouse's Eye

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Bryan William Jones, The University of Utah, Moran Eye Center)

This computational molecular phenotype image of a mouse's eye reveals the diversity of cell metabolism in the retina. The optic nerve is in the upper right of the image. The rectus muscles can be seen in red and gold, attached to the green sclera (the white part of the eye). Retinal layers appear in a rainbow of colors from light gold to pink and purple, while other cells show up in blue and green.

Cool as a ...

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Robert Rock Belliveau, MD)

This honorable mention photo is the skin of an immature cucumber, magnified 800 times. These structures are called "trichomes," and they act as little spears, protecting the young vegetable from plant-eaters. The lower part of the trichomes contains bitter, toxic chemicals that make herbivores go "ick!"

False Cliff

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Babak Anasori, Michael Naguib, Yury Gogotsi, Michel W. Barsoum, Drexel University)

It's not the edge of the Grand Canyon; this People's Choice winner was created by placing a layered compound called Ti3AIC2 in hydrofluoric acid. The acid selectively etches away some layers of the compound, creating this odd scene.

Attack of the Antibody

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Emiko Paul and Quade Paul, Echo Medical Media; Ron Gamble, University of Alabama, Birmingham Insight)

This honorable mention illustration shows tumor death-cell receptors (DR5) on breast cancer cells targeted by the antibody TRA-8.

Teeny-Tiny Tubes

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Joel Brehm, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Office of Research and Economic Development)

This three-dimensional illustration, which garnered an honorable mention, shows the production of carbon nanotubes. University of Nebraska-Lincoln electrical engineer Yongfeng Lu discovered a laser-based production technique that can create these nanotubes to careful specifications.

The Color of Math

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Konrad Polthier and Konstantin Poelke, Free University of Berlin)

This honorable mention visualization shows the visualization of a complex function using colors to represent every complex number. Complex functions are important in math, physics and engineering.

Cell Separation

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Andrew Noske, Thomas Deerinck, National Center fo rMicroscopy & imaging Research, University of California, San Diego; Horng Ou, Clodagh O'Shea, Salk Institute)

This image of cell separation garnered a People's Choice award for its creator. The cell membrane is shown in blue and the cell's chromosomes in yellow as the cell divides or undergoes mitosis.

Ebola Unveiled

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Ivan Konstantinov, Yury Stefanov, Alexander Kovalevsky, Anastasya Bakulina; Visual Science)

This honorable mention poster reveals the inner and outer workings of the deadly virus Ebola.

Foldit

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Seth Cooper, David Baker, Zoran Popovic, Firas Khatib, Jeff Flatten, Kefan Xu, Don-Yu Hsiao and Riley Adams, Center for Game Science at the University of Washington.)

A screengrab from a winning interactive game called "Foldit" that allows players to compete against one another to fold the most efficient protein shape for a task.

The Power of Minus Ten

2011 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge

(Image credit: Laura Lynn Gonzalez, Green-Eye Visualization)

Taking an honorable mention in the gaming category, The Power of Minus Ten allows players to zoom in on the human body at different levels of magnification, all the way down to the molecular level as seen in this screengrab.