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At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

It may not be safe for men to get blood transfusions from women who have been pregnant. During a 10-year study, men who got transfusions from women with a history of pregnancy were 13 percent more likely to die than men who got transfusions from other men. It's unclear why, but changes that occur in a woman's immune system during pregnancy might play a role. [Read More About the Blood Transfusion Findings]

A stock photo of a Dover sole fish.
A stock photo of a Dover sole fish.
Credit: Edward Westmacott/Shutterstock

A live fish jumped down a man's throat, sending the unfortunate fisher into cardiac arrest. The man caught the fish during a fishing trip in Bournemouth, England. But the fish jumped into his windpipe when he bent down to kiss it. Luckily, paramedics pulled it out with forceps, and the man recovered. [Read More About the Man's Fishy Experience]

Darwin holding Devota's infant.
Darwin holding Devota's infant.
Credit: Hitonaru Nishie

Moments after an infant chimpanzee was born, another chimp snatched it away from its mother and cannibalized it. This traumatic event may explain why most chimp mothers go on "maternity leave" — that is, go into hiding when they're ready to give birth. The next time this particular mother gave birth, she went on maternity leave and successfully had an infant. [Read More About Chimp Cannibalism]

A man in New York credits his Apple watch with saving his life. An app on the watch notified the man that his heart rate had sharply increased. That and a few other symptoms prompted him to go to the hospital, where he was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism. Doctors gave him blood thinners, which likely saved his life. [Read More About the Life-Saving Experience]

The main ingredient in magic mushrooms, known as psilocybin, may ease symptoms of depression, a small study finds. Researchers gave psilocybin to 20 people with depression, and found that the patients' depressive symptoms declined (that is, the people felt better). However, there was no control group, and more research needs to be done, the researchers said. [Read More About the Magic Mushroom Research]

Dense clouds of ash and gasses expelled by the eruption of a volcano — such as Indonesia's Mount Bromo, shown here in 2010 — can affect temperature and weather, sometimes for years.
Dense clouds of ash and gasses expelled by the eruption of a volcano — such as Indonesia's Mount Bromo, shown here in 2010 — can affect temperature and weather, sometimes for years.
Credit: Putu Artana/Shutterstock

Did volcanoes doom a dynasty in ancient Egypt? A group of researchers suggests that the aerosols that formed when ancient volcanoes erupted disrupted weather patterns, including the monsoons in Egypt. A drier monsoon season may have reduced Nile flooding, leading to fewer crops and famine, which could have sparked political unrest during the Ptolemaic dynasty. [Read More About the Dynasty-Dooming Volcanoes]

Should you let a sleeping dog lie? The answer is yes! If Fido takes a long nap, he's better able to consolidate new memories in his sleep. The result? Fido can get a leg up on learning new tricks, so long as he's able to get some substantial shut-eye. [Read More About Sleeping Dogs]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other "Strange News" stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.