At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

"What... have I gotten myself into?"
"What... have I gotten myself into?"
Credit: Richard Tsong-Taatarii/Minneapolis Star Tribune/Zuma

 

A raccoon recently took social phobia to new heights when he scaled a 23-story skyscraper in Minnesota — all to avoid dealing with throngs of people below. This death-defying stunt is actually no biggie for the masked mammals: Raccoons use sharp, non-retractable claws to dig into craggy surfaces, and they can rotate their back paws 180 degrees to climb descend a vertical surface (like a skyscraper) face-forward. Raccoons routinely climb trees, bare steam pipes and garbage cans. [Read more about the daredevil raccoon]

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un watches a ballistic missile test while, in the background, a soldier guards Kim's personal john.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un watches a ballistic missile test while, in the background, a soldier guards Kim's personal john.
Credit: STR/AFP/KCNA/Getty

 

Speaking of waste, the North Korean leader Kim Jong Un apparently goes to extremes to hide his. The "supreme leader" traveled to the Singapore summit, and everywhere else, with a personal loo, including an emergency chamber pot in his Mercedes. It turns out that a person's poop can contain top secret information — from DNA to secrets about the pooper's health. [Read more about the North Korean leader's personal pooper]

Apollo astronauts may be responsible for the moon's mysterious temperature spike in the '70s, a new study suggests.
Apollo astronauts may be responsible for the moon's mysterious temperature spike in the '70s, a new study suggests.
Credit: NASA

And global warming isn't just a thing on Earth — lost NASA tapes reveal that humans also caused the moon to warm — sort of. From 1969 to 1972, the astronauts kicked up so much dust that they darkened the moon's surface. That, in turn, caused the moon to absorb more heat, raising the temperature nearly 4 degrees Fahrenheit. [Read more about the lunar warming]

This odd-looking fish was pulled from a river in southern China.
This odd-looking fish was pulled from a river in southern China.
Credit: Newsflare

Fishers in China recently hauled up a mysterious creature that looks like a fish with a bird's head. While the fowl fish had people the world over scratching their heads, most experts believe the fish is an ordinary freshwater carp. And killjoy scientists have suggested a much more ordinary reason for the fish's freakish appearance — a developmental problem that caused swelling in the fish's noggin. [Read more about the fish-bird]

Ground-based lasers developed by the USSR decades ago — conceptually illustrated here by artist Edward L. Cooper — were capable of interfering with some U.S. satellites.
Ground-based lasers developed by the USSR decades ago — conceptually illustrated here by artist Edward L. Cooper — were capable of interfering with some U.S. satellites.
Credit: U.S. Department of Defense

Russian scientists recently proposed converting an old telescope they had lying around into a debris-vaporizing laser cannon. In space. Though the idea sounds silly, about half a million bits of space junk currently orbit Earth. And the Russians aren't even the first to propose such a trash-zapping death ray; Japanese and Chinese researchers are also eyeing similar solutions. [Read more about the space cannon]  

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other "Strange News" stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.