At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

 

A wild bull moose in Spray Valley Provincial Park in Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada.
A wild bull moose in Spray Valley Provincial Park in Kananaskis Country, Alberta, Canada.
Credit: Moose image via Shutterstock

A pair of battling moose were recently caught on video locking antlers by the side of a road in — where else? — Canada. A man in northern New Brunswick was in his car when he saw the fighting animals, and he captured footage of the rarely-scene moose melee. [Read more about the moose duel]

 

 

This Gram-stained photomicrograph depicts numbers of <i>Bordetella pertussis</i> bacteria, which is the etiologic pathogen for pertussis, also known as whooping cough.
This Gram-stained photomicrograph depicts numbers of Bordetella pertussis bacteria, which is the etiologic pathogen for pertussis, also known as whooping cough.
Credit: CDC.

A group of volunteers in the U.K. agreed to expose themselves to live whooping cough bacteria, for science. Researchers dripped the bacteria into participants' noses under controlled conditions, and then observed how their bodies responded to the infection. [Read more about the whooping cough volunteers]

 

 

A gold-dusted day gecko in Hawaii recently made "a bazillion" phone calls when his toes inadvertently pinged the keys on someone's cell phone.
A gold-dusted day gecko in Hawaii recently made "a bazillion" phone calls when his toes inadvertently pinged the keys on someone's cell phone.
Credit: Shutterstock

An adorable gecko caused widespread confusion, after making "a bazillion calls" from a phone in an animal hospital in Hawaii. The lizard was found crouching on the phone's touchscreen, inadvertently making calls with its feet. [Read more about the prank-caller reptile]

 

 

A retinal organoid — shown here at day 43 of growth — doesn't look much like an eye, but it enables scientists to observe how eye cells grow and interact.
A retinal organoid — shown here at day 43 of growth — doesn't look much like an eye, but it enables scientists to observe how eye cells grow and interact.
Credit: Johns Hopkins University

Researchers grew human retinal tissue in a lab "from scratch," gaining the first-ever glimpse of development in the eye cells that allow us to see in color. [Read more about the lab-grown "mini-eyes"]

 

 

The tiny 0.4-inch-long (1 centimeter) neanderthal finger bones.
The tiny 0.4-inch-long (1 centimeter) neanderthal finger bones.
Credit: Barbara Drobniewicz

About 115,000 years ago in what is now Poland, an enormous bird devoured a Neanderthal child, and scientists are piecing together the gruesome scene from fossils of finger bones that appear to have been digested by a prehistoric avian. [Read more about the Neanderthal fossils]

 

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other "Strange News" stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.