At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

This Hawaiian monk seal got an eel stuck in its nose. Scientists say this is a rare, but not unheard of, occurrence.
This Hawaiian monk seal got an eel stuck in its nose. Scientists say this is a rare, but not unheard of, occurrence.
Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Brittany Dolan

 

A young Hawaiian Monk Seal got an eel stuck up its nose. Researchers removed it and the seal is ok. Though they don't know what exactly happened, they think the eel could have darted into the seal's nose out of self-defense. [Read more theories here

The 500-year-old skeleton was still wearing expensive leather boots when it was discovered along the banks of the Thames River.
The 500-year-old skeleton was still wearing expensive leather boots when it was discovered along the banks of the Thames River.
Credit: copyright MOLA Headland Infrastructure

Archaeologists discovered a 500-year-old skeleton wearing thigh-high leather boots. The skeleton was found facedown, so it's possible the man died accidentally. [Read more about these old boots]

A remote location in northwestern British Columbia is home to a huge, unexplored cave.
A remote location in northwestern British Columbia is home to a huge, unexplored cave.
Credit: Catherine Hickson

Scientists discovered what may be Canada's largest cave. This unexplored pit is fitted with a waterfall that likely flows into a river nearly 7,000 miles away. [Read more about Sarlacc's Pit

This snapping turtle is carrying the "earth" on its back.
This snapping turtle is carrying the "earth" on its back.
Credit: Timothy C. Roth

 

This common snapping turtle was photographed carrying a piece of the Earth on its back. She had just emerged from underground near a dried-up lake and was making her way to her winter mud hole home. [Read more about her journey]

Researchers found the plague sample on the remains of a 20-year-old woman, shown above.
Researchers found the plague sample on the remains of a 20-year-old woman, shown above.
Credit: Karl-Göran Sjögren / University of Gothenburg

In a nearly 5,000-year-old tomb in Sweden, researchers discovered the oldest known strain og the microbe responsible for the plague. The findings suggest that the microbe could have devasted European settlements at the end of the Stone Age. [Read more about this ancient plague

This artistic impression shows the gas motion around the supermassive black hole in the center of the Circinus galaxy.
This artistic impression shows the gas motion around the supermassive black hole in the center of the Circinus galaxy.
Credit: NAOJ

The hot-and-cold gases that swirl around supermassive black holes aren't really like "donuts" but rather like "fountains," researchers say. [Read more about these swirling gases

This pottery jar seems to date to the Indus Valley civilization.
This pottery jar seems to date to the Indus Valley civilization.
Credit: Hansons Auctioneers

Putting down $5 (4 pounds) at a flea market, a man unknowingly bought a 4,000-year-old piece of pottery. He used it as a toothbrush holder until he found out about its ancient roots. [Read more about this ancient pot]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other "Strange News" stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.