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In Photos: A 'Robo-Mermaid' Embarks on Its Maiden Dive

Meet OceanOne

OceanOne Humanoid Robot Diver

(Image credit: Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM)

A humanoid robot, dubbed OceanOne, dove to a shipwreck in the Mediterranean that had been unexplored since it sank in 1664.

OceanOne was designed by engineers at Stanford University to explore parts of the ocean that are inaccessible to humans. The robot diver recently explored the La Lune shipwreck in the Mediterranean. [Read full story about the OceanOne robot]

Undersea explorer

OceanOne Robot

(Image credit: Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM)

The OceanOne robot has a torso, a head — with stereoscopic vision — and articulated arms. The robot recently dove to "La Lune," King Louis XIV's flagship, which sank in 1664.

Working together

OceanOne Working with Human Diver

(Image credit: Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM)

The OceanOne robot can investigate parts of the ocean that are less accessible to people, with the flexibility and dexterity of a human diver. The bot was also designed to work with human divers, as demonstrated in this photo, where the robot is easily handing objects to a human diver.

Robo-mermaid

OceanOne Tests

(Image credit: Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM)

Before it dove to the La Lune shipwreck, the OceanOne robot was tested rigorously in the waters along the southern coast of France.

Diver's dexterity

OceanOne Robotic Hands

(Image credit: Screengrab via YouTube)

The OceanOne robot has articulated hands that allow it to explore like a human diver. Human controlleres can also "feel" what the robot is touching, using force sensors and haptic feedback in the robotic hands.

Teamwork

OceanOne Fist Bump

(Image credit: Screengrab via YouTube)

The OceanOne robot fist bumps a human diver.

Recovered artifact

OceanOne Recovers La Lune Artifact

(Image credit: Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM)

The first object recovered from the La Lune shipwreck was a vase that hadn’t seen air since 1664.

Robotic parts

OceanOne Mechanical Parts

(Image credit: Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM)

The OceanOne robot diver was built by engineers at Stanford University, in California. The bot performs like a human diver and is controlled through a touch-sensitive interface.

Human-controlled

OceanOne Human Controllers

(Image credit: Frederic Osada and Teddy Seguin/DRASSM)

During the robot's dive to La Lune, OceanOne’s fine movements were controlled by humans above the seafloor, via haptic feedback joysticks.