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No Creepy Crawlies Here: Gallery of the Cutest Bugs

Rainbow Jewel Beetle

Rainbow Jewel Beetle

(Image credit: Katie VanBlaricum | Insect Art)

Jewel beetles come in all different colors of the rainbow. Some species, such as the above Chrysochroa fulgens, even display a metallic gleam that shows off all these colors at once, similar to the visual effect of an oil slick in a puddle.

Pretty as a Bead

Australia Jewel Beetle

This unique jewel beetle species is called Temognatha alternata and is native to Queensland, Australia. It flaunts stripes of yellow, navy blue, red and aquamarine. The one above is hiding its antennae close to its body.

Adorable Red Milkweed Beetle

Red Milkweed Beetle

(Image credit: Treffly Coyne )

The Red Milkweed Beetle (Tetraopes tetraophthalmus) belongs to the Cerambycidae family of longhorn beetles and is red with black dots like a ladybug, but has a long and narrow body like a firefly. Its species name literally means "four eyes" because its antennae split each eye in two. Also like ladybugs, they are toxic to some animals, and their spots warn hungry predators to stay away.

Colorful Treehopper

Treehopper

(Image credit: Nicolas Gompel)

There are more than 2,000 species of treehoppers (Heteroptera, Membracidae), which each grow fascinating "helmets" that can mimic the environment in which they live — or even look like completely different insects. Recent findings suggest that treehoppers developed this headgear by reactivating and repurposing their wing-making machinery.

Coral-Caped Treehopper

Treehopper

(Image credit: Nicolas Gompel)

Researchers studied the genes involved in the treehoppers' development of both wings and helmets and found similarities. Although the helmets are created using the treehopper's wing-making machinery, they aren't used for flight. These structures come in many different shapes, colors and sizes.