Friday the 13th: A day when superstitions rule and every setback can be chocked up to bad luck. This inauspicious date pops up at least once a year, and when it does, quite a few questions pop up, as well. Why is Friday the 13th considered to be unlucky? And who decided the number 13 was worthy of people's fear? If you have questions about Friday the 13th, we have answers. From the history of this unlucky day to the math that explains how often the dreaded date occurs in a calendary year, here's everything you need to know about Friday the 13th.

Did you know that this year had three Friday the 13ths? Why So Many 'Unlucky' Days in 2015?

How did Friday the 13th become associated with bad luck and superstition? Turns out, the day has been considered unlucky for not much more than 100 years. Read on to find out the Origins of Friday the 13th: How the Day Got So Spooky.

Statistically, Friday the 13th isn't a more dangerous day than any other in the year, but that doesn't mean weird things haven't happened on the notorious date throughout history. Here are 13 Freaky Things That Happened on Friday the 13th.

Humans have well-developed brains, we've built complex technologies and made centuries of scientific progress, but we remain a fearful, superstitious lot. Why Are Humans So Superstitious?

Fear of Friday the 13th is ingrained in pop culture, but where does that superstition come from? Folklorists think the dread goes back at least a few centuries. Why is Friday the 13th Considered Unlucky?

The number 13 is considered an unlucky number, but is there any statitiscal proof to support that superstition? Statistically Speaking, Is Friday the 13th Really Unlucky?

From breaking mirrors to walking under ladders, here are The Surprising Origins of 9 Common Superstitions.

Does Friday the 13th have you dodging black cats and going out of your way to avoid walking under ladders? If so, this countdown may be perfect for you. Here are 13 Freaky Facts About Friday the 13th.

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