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Photo Gallery: Snow Paralyzes the South

Clearing the way

winter storm

(Image credit: Lindsay Thurmond)

A snow plow clear roads in Georgia on Tuesday.

Long way home

Alabama bike

(Image credit: Clinton Colmenares)

People in Birmingham, Ala., made it home any way they could after a winter storm paralyzed the city on Tuesday.

Empty roads

Atlanta highways

(Image credit: Hope Vaziri)

Highway 400 in Atlanta, Ga., is empty Wednesday morning after businesses and schools closed on Tuesday (Jan. 28) because of a winter storm.

Gridlock

Atlanta gridlock

(Image credit: Katherine Harrison)

Snow fell during rush hour in Atlanta, snarling traffic and trapping motorists for hours.

Stuck in snow and ice

Gridlock in Birmingham

(Image credit: Clinton Colmenares)

Gridlock in Birmingham, Ala. on Tuesday afternoon.

Make way

Fire truck wrong way

(Image credit: Katherine Harrison)

A fire truck drives the wrong way up an Atlanta street because of gridlock.

Polar bear plunge

Snowy pool

(Image credit: Clinton Colmenares)

Snow surrounds a pool in Birmingham, Ala.

Big snow

Snow depth

(Image credit: NOAA)

The snow depth measured by NOAA satellites after the winter storm struck Jan. 28.

Record warmth

record highs Alaska

(Image credit: National Weather Service - Alaska)

While the South froze, Alaska hit record high temperatures this week.

Storm from space

Storm from space

(Image credit: NOAA)

The winter storm as seen from space by NOAA's weather satellite.

Southern discomfort

winter storm

(Image credit: CJ Lake)

Before the snow moved in, cold temperatures turned a water feature into an ice sculpture on the campus of the University of South Carolina in Columbia.

Becky Oskin
Becky Oskin covers Earth science, climate change and space, as well as general science topics. Becky was a science reporter at Live Science and The Pasadena Star-News; she has freelanced for New Scientist and the American Institute of Physics. She earned a master's degree in geology from Caltech, a bachelor's degree from Washington State University, and a graduate certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz.