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Dramatic Images of Arctic Camera Traps

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(Image credit: WCS)

Scientists with the Wildlife Conservation Society placed camera traps in Arctic Alaska to see how the presence of predators that benefited from human activity were impacting nesting birds in the area.

In this shot, a grizzly bear is sniffing around close to the camera.

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(Image credit: WCS)

Near the Ikpikpuk River, the most common nest predators are arctic ground squirrels like this one caught by the camera.

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(Image credit: WCS)

Sometimes, the camera inadvertently captures images of other wildlife in the area including this caribou mother and calf.

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(Image credit: WCS)

An Arctic fox charging a greater white-fronted goose nest defended by the adults, in the Prudhoe Bay oilfields.

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(Image credit: WCS)

A red fox eating a Lapland longspur nestling.

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(Image credit: WCS)

A common raven in the Prudhoe Bay oil field caught by the camera trap removing an egg from a Lapland longspur nest.