Gallery: Monkey Mug Shots

Pygmy Marmoset

A pygmy marmoset

(Image credit: Michael Lynch (opens in new tab), Shutterstock (opens in new tab))

A pygmy marmoset clings to a tree. These teensy primates weigh less than 5 ounces.

Baby Emperor Tamarin

Baby emperor tamarin.

(Image credit: Eric Gevaert (opens in new tab), Shutterstock (opens in new tab))

A baby emperor tamarin gnaws a branch. This species of tamarin lives in small family groups.

Emperor Tamarin

Emperor Tamarin

(Image credit: Eric Gevaert (opens in new tab), Shutterstock (opens in new tab))

The South American emperor tamarin was supposedly named for its resemblance to the German emperor Wilhelm II. Like many New World primates, the tamarin has evolved a distinctive face.

Cottontop Tamarin

Cottontop Tamarin

(Image credit: Eric Isselée (opens in new tab), Shutterstock (opens in new tab))

Impressive hairdo! The cottontop tamarin is a native of Colombia and is critically endangered.

Stephanie Pappas
Live Science Contributor

Stephanie Pappas is a contributing writer for Live Science, covering topics ranging from geoscience to archaeology to the human brain and behavior. She was previously a senior writer for Live Science but is now a freelancer based in Denver, Colorado, and regularly contributes to Scientific American and The Monitor, the monthly magazine of the American Psychological Association. Stephanie received a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of South Carolina and a graduate certificate in science communication from the University of California, Santa Cruz.