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Hurricane Dorian Barrels Up the Coast, Threatening the Carolinas

NASA astronaut Christina Koch shared this view of Hurricane Dorian from the International Space Station on Sept. 2, 2019.
NASA astronaut Christina Koch shared this view of Hurricane Dorian from the International Space Station on Sept. 2, 2019.
(Image: © Astro_Christina/Twitter)

Hurricane Dorian, after devastating the Bahamas over the weekend while sparing Florida a direct hit, is now moving up the East Coast of the U.S., threatening the Carolinas, according to the latest update from the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

The storm is currently moving at 9 mph (15 km/h) parallel to the coast of northeastern Florida and is expected to move up near or over the coast of South Carolina and North Carolina tomorrow (Sept. 5) and Friday (Sept. 6). Hurricane warnings extend up to the North Carolina-Virginia border. 

Dorian was downgraded to a Category 2 hurricane with sustained maximum winds of 105 mph (165 km/h), and "a slow weakening is expected during the next few days," according to the advisory. "However, Dorian is expected to remain a powerful hurricane during this time."

Related: Photos: Hurricane Dorian Leaves Devastation in Its Wake

Hurricane Dorian track.

(Image credit: NOAA)

Regardless of whether the eyewall of Dorian makes direct landfall on its move up the coast, "life-threatening storm surge and dangerous winds" are expected to hit parts of the Florida east coast and the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas, according to the advisory. Water levels could rise before strong winds take hold, and residents should continue to follow the advice given by local emergency officials, the NHC wrote.

Dangerous flash flooding is expected along parts of the Carolinas' coasts, and storm surge, wind and rain may hit parts of the Virginia coast and the Chesapeake Bay. 

Originally published on Live Science.