At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

Parasitoid wasps like D. xenomorph inspired the alien from Ridley Scott's 'Alien.'
Parasitoid wasps like D. xenomorph inspired the alien from Ridley Scott's 'Alien.'
Credit: Erinn Fagan-Jeffries

Scientists described three new species of fierce Australian wasps. These insects reproduce by injecting their eggs into caterpillars, which are then ripped apart when the eggs hatch and eat their way out of the caterpillar's body. The scientists appropriately named one of the wasps "Xenomorph," due to its close resemblance to the terrifying creature in the sci-fi horror film "Alien." [Read more about the 'Alien' wasp]

You can't taste this rainbow, but you can watch it get obliterated by a rocket. A viral video shows the launch of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. Sound waves bursting from the rocket's powerful engines ripped through the rainbow smear seen next to the sun. The roar from the rocket's main engine was so loud that visible sound waves ripple through the clouds. [Read more about the booming rocket]

A researcher (carefully) holds one of the arsenic-poisoned books. The tome dates to the Renaissance, but was likely coated in arsenic paint by misguided Victorians.
A researcher (carefully) holds one of the arsenic-poisoned books. The tome dates to the Renaissance, but was likely coated in arsenic paint by misguided Victorians.
Credit: University of Southern Denmark/ The Conversation

When a team of researchers at the University of Southern Denmark (SDU) found three Renaissance-era manuscripts, they noticed the pages were covered in a thick layer of green paint. But under an X-ray microscope, they saw it wasn't paint covering the pages, but actually glowing green arsenic — a deadly poisonous chemical. [Read more about the poisonous books]

Plumes rise above Enceladus.
Plumes rise above Enceladus.
Credit: NASA

There's a vibrating column of plasma passing between fiery Saturn and its icy moon Enceladus. The vibrations resemble sound waves, which prompted researchers to convert a recording of the plasma to a sound file. They're calling Saturn's song an "auroral hiss" because it's made of the same material (plasma) in the auroras that are seen above Earth. [Read more about Saturn's song]

When you imagine Earth's oldest color, think pink.
When you imagine Earth's oldest color, think pink.
Credit: iStock/Getty Images Plus

Earth's prehistoric ocean may have been tinted pink. Researchers discovered this when they extracted dark red and deep purple chlorophyll pigments from bacteria fossils preserved in rocks under the Sahara Desert. When they pulverized the fossils and distilled the colors, they found a brilliant pink. [Read more about Earth's first color]

The newfound mosaic, dating to nearly 1,600 years ago, shows two spies carrying a cluster of grapes.
The newfound mosaic, dating to nearly 1,600 years ago, shows two spies carrying a cluster of grapes.
Credit: Jim Haberman

Archaeologists have uncovered an ancient mosaic depicting a case of biblical espionage. The mosaic shows two spies who the Bible says Moses sent to scout the promised land of Canaan. This mosaic — one of about a dozen found in a 1,600-year-old synagogue — is helping archaeologists learn about life in Israel during Rome's Christian rule. [Read more about these biblical mosaics]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other "Strange News" stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.