At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

The hard contact lens, after it was surgically removed.
The hard contact lens, after it was surgically removed.
Credit: BMJ Case Reports 2018

Nearly 30 years ago, a 14-year-old in the U.K. lost her contact lens during a game of badminton. Doctors found the lens embedded in her eyelid, 28 years later. [Read more about the lost contact lens]

Artist's illustration of one satellite inspecting another. On Aug. 14, 2018, a US diplomat said that a Russian satellite described as a "space apparatus inspector" has been behaving very oddly on orbit, raising the possibility that it may be a space weapon of some sort.
Artist's illustration of one satellite inspecting another. On Aug. 14, 2018, a US diplomat said that a Russian satellite described as a "space apparatus inspector" has been behaving very oddly on orbit, raising the possibility that it may be a space weapon of some sort.
Credit: SSL

A Russian satellite launched last October is behaving oddly. Russians officials say the satellite is a "space apparatus inspector," but U.S. aren't buying it. [Read more about the weird Russian satellite]

Choi Yong-seok, CEO of Shinil Group, looks at video footage taken by a submersible of the shipwreck (possibly the Dmitri Donskoi warship), during a news conference on a Russian ship in Seoul on July 26, 2018.
Choi Yong-seok, CEO of Shinil Group, looks at video footage taken by a submersible of the shipwreck (possibly the Dmitri Donskoi warship), during a news conference on a Russian ship in Seoul on July 26, 2018.
Credit: Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Last month, reports of a sunken Russian warship that was rumored to contain $132 billion worth of gold made headlines and nudged stock investments. As it turns out, however, the "find" was very likely a cryptocurrency scam. [Read more about the sunken warship scam]

Why does spaghetti always fracture into three or more pieces? Heroic scientists have an answer.
Why does spaghetti always fracture into three or more pieces? Heroic scientists have an answer.
Credit: Shutterstock

"Breaking" news: Physicists have finally done it. They've figured out how to snap a piece of dry spaghetti in half. (If you're not impressed, try accomplishing this feat in your own kitchen.) [Read more about spaghetti physics]

University of Arizona astronomers spotted an... unusual-looking formation near Mars' South Pole. (Muppet Labs could not be reached for comment.)
University of Arizona astronomers spotted an... unusual-looking formation near Mars' South Pole. (Muppet Labs could not be reached for comment.)
Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona; (inset) Andrea McCallin/ABC via Getty Images

On Monday (Aug. 13), NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spotted a strange geological formation on the surface of the Red Planet. And it looks just like everyone's favorite science Muppet, Beaker. [Read more about the Muppet on Mars]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other "Strange News" stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.