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Mastodon Tusk Marked by Human-Made Tools (Photos)

Neil Puckett surfaces

Neil Puckett surfaces

(Image credit: Brendan Fenerty)

Neil Puckett, a Ph.D. student from Texas A&M University involved in the excavations, surfaces with the limb bone of a juvenile mastodon.

Jessi Halligan during the dive

Jessi Halligan during the dive

(Image credit: Brendan Fenerty)

Jessi Halligan, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Florida State University. Halligan, a co-author of the study, was also the lead diver and excavation manager at the Page-Ladson site.

Examining a new find

Examining a new find

(Image credit: Photo by B. Fenerty, courtesy CSFA)

Co-principal investigator Jessi Halligan examining a mastodon bone brought up from a dive by CSFA student Neil Puckett at the Page-Ladson site.

Biface close-up

Biface close-up

(Image credit: Photo by J. Halligan)

A close-up photo of a biface — a type of prehistoric stone tool — as found in 14,550-year-old sediments at the Page-Ladson site.

How excavation worked

How excavation worked

(Image credit: Artwork by J.Halligan)

A schematic showing underwater excavation methodology at Page-Ladson, and the location of an artifact.

[Read more about the underwater excavation of these and other ancient artifacts.]