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In Photos: Life in the Arctic region of the Americas

Life in the Canadian Arctic

Canadian Inuit

(Image credit: Carsten Egevang)

The first groups of people to live in the Arctic region of the Americas do not have any descendents living today, according to the largest study yet of ancient human DNA.

Frigid portrait

Canadian Inuit Portrait

(Image credit: Jette Bang Photos/Arktisk Institut)

Portrait of a modern-day Canadian Inuit.

Way of the spear

Canadian Inuit Holding Spear

(Image credit: Jette Bang Photos/Arktisk Institut)

A modern-day Canadian Inuit poses with a spear.

Traditional culture

Inuit Boats

(Image credit: Jette Bang Photos/Arktisk Institut)

The Inuit use these traditional boats, known as umiak, for hunting and transportation.

Pristine landscape

Canadian Inuit

(Image credit: Carsten Egevang)

Canadian Inuits live in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and parts of Quebec and Labrador.

Up north

Inuit Environment

(Image credit: Carsten Egevang)

The Inuits survive in harsh climates in Alaska, northern Canada and Greenland.

Looking for clues

Searching for Human Remains in Greenland

(Image credit: Claus Andreasen)

Scientists conducted genetic studies to unravel the settlement history of the New World Arctic.

Unearthing remains

Greenland Study

(Image credit: Claus Andreasen)

Scientists searched for human remains in northern Greenland.

Human migrations

Grass-Covered Midden in Greenland

(Image credit: Claus Andreasen)

This photos shows Qajaa, a grass-covered deep-frozen midden in West Greenland with remains from Early Paleo-Eskimo cultures.

Wooden doll

Wooden Eskimo Doll

(Image credit: University of Aberdeen/Qanirtuuq, Inc.)

Wooden dolls (such as the one pictured here) were used by prehistoric Berin g Sea Eskimos for religious and ceremonial purposes. Occasionally, though, the dolls were made as children's toys.

Ceremonial carvings

Wooden Eskimo Doll

(Image credit: University of Aberdeen/Qanirtuuq, Inc.)

These dolls were excavated by the University of Aberdeen and the Yup’ik village of Quinhagak from an archaeological site in Nunalleq, Alaska.