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Watch Live: The longest partial lunar eclipse in 580 years

Attention all eclipse-watchers! The longest partial lunar eclipse of the century will take place tomorrow morning between Thursday (Nov. 18) and Friday (Nov. 19), and it will be visible in all 50 U.S. states. Here's how to catch the stunning event where you are, or watch it live here on Live Science.

Earth's shadow will cover 97% of the full moon, blocking most of the sun's light and staining the moon a dark, rusty red. It will be the longest partial lunar eclipse in 580 years, according to the Holcomb Observatory at Butler University, Indiana.

NASA forecasts that the almost-total eclipse of the Micro Beaver Full Moon will last around 3 hours, 28 minutes and 23 seconds. It is due to begin at around 2:19 a.m. EST (7:19 a.m. UTC); reach its maximum at roughly 4 a.m. EST (9 a.m. UTC); and end at 5:47 a.m. EST (10:47 a.m. UTC). The Micro Beaver Moon is so named because it occurs in the lead-up to the beaver-trapping season and at the point when the moon is farthest from Earth.

Related: Photos: 2017 Great American Solar Eclipse

This composite image shows a blood moon lunar eclipse as seen in London and the Acacus mountains in the Libyan desert. (Image credit: Richard McManus/Getty Images)

Exact timings for your location can be found at timeanddate.com. The eclipse will be visible from North America and the Pacific Ocean, Western Europe, eastern Australia, New Zealand and Japan. The early stages of the eclipse occur before moonrise in eastern Asia, Australia and New Zealand, but eclipse-watchers in these regions will be able to catch the event as it reaches its maximum. Viewers in South America and Western Europe, on the other hand, will see the moon set before the eclipse is at its peak. 

If you're in Africa, the Middle East or western Asia, you won't be able to catch the eclipse where you are, and other areas may have clouds blocking the view, so checking weather reports is vital. 

If you are unable to catch the eclipse in person, fear not: You can watch it live on Nov. 19 at a number of websites, including a stream starting at 2:00 a.m. EST (7:00 a.m. UTC) right here at Live Science, which will host the Virtual Telescope Project broadcast.

If you miss the eclipse in person and online, you'll have two more opportunities next year to see a full lunar eclipse between May 15 and 16, 2022, followed by another one between Nov. 7 and 8, later that year, according to timeanddate.com.

Live Science would like to publish your partial lunar eclipse photos. Please email us images at community@livescience.com. Please include your name, location and a few details about your viewing experience that we can share in the caption.

Live Science would like to publish your partial lunar eclipse photos. Please email us images at community@livescience.com. Please include your name, location and a few details about your viewing experience that we can share in the caption.

Originally published on Live Science.

Ben Turner is a U.K. based staff writer at Live Science. He covers physics and astronomy, among other topics like weird animals and climate change. He graduated from University College London with a degree in particle physics before training as a journalist. When he's not writing, Ben enjoys reading literature, playing the guitar and embarrassing himself with chess.