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220-lb. 'Litter Ball' Found Inside a Dead Sperm Whale's Belly

A dead sperm whale lies on a beach.
The whale stranded while still alive and had been dead for about 48 hours before experts with the Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme performed a necropsy.
(Image: © Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme)

When workers with a whale strandings agency in Scotland performed a necropsy on a recently beached sperm whale, they found a gruesome surprise: The animal had died with around 220 lbs. (100 kilograms) of trash in its stomach.

The young male sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) washed ashore on Nov. 28 at Luskentyre beach in Scotland's Outer Hebrides islands. It died shortly thereafter, a representative with the Scottish Marine Animal Strandings Scheme (SMASS), part of the Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme at Scotland's Rural College (SRUC) in Aberdeen, wrote on Facebook on Dec. 1.

Fishing nets, rope bundles, tubes and an assortment of plastic garbage formed a compact mass — a so-called litter ball — inside the 20-ton whale, "and some of it it looked like it had been there for some time," according to the post.

Related: Whale Photos: Giants of the Deep 

Because whales' skin and blubber insulate them so effectively, bacteria inside a whale corpse can multiply quickly even when air temperatures are low. As the bacteria help to decompose the remains, they produce gases that then build up pressure inside the body, and the sperm whale on the Scottish beach was no exception — it "sort of exploded" upon investigation, according to the Facebook post.

"By the time we got to it, [it] had been dead for 48 hours and pretty much most of the guts blew out of the side when we stuck a knife in it," an SMASS representative wrote.

SMASS researchers and volunteers collect and analyze data on stranded animals that wash up along the Scottish coast, which includes 790 islands and spans nearly 12,000 miles (19,000 kilometers), according to the SMASS website. By performing necropsies and studying the remains of beached marine life — sharks, porpoises, dolphins, sea turtles and seals, as well as whales — scientists can better understand the biological and environmental conditions that lead to strandings. 

While the amount of garbage inside the whale was "horrific," the animal appeared to be in good health and wasn't malnourished, according to the post. It's likely that the trash ball interfered with digestion, but SMASS experts didn't find any signs that the ingested debris blocked the whale's intestines.

Fishing net, rope and other debris were pulled from the stomach of a dead sperm whale.

Inside the whale was a condensed mass of fishing debris and land trash. (Image credit: Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme)

Garbage in

Other grim examples of dead whales with bellies full of plastic have washed up on other countries' shores. A pregnant sperm whale that floated up to an Italian beach in April died with 49 lbs. (22 kg) of trash in her stomach, and a Cuvier's beaked whale that beached in the Philippines in March had swallowed 88 lbs. (40 kg) of trash. Sperm whales that beached in 2018 in Spain and Indonesia carried similarly indigestible masses in their guts, Live Science previously reported.

In the United Kingdom, stranded marine animals commonly have microplastic particles in their bodies, though it's unknown how this affects their overall health, researchers reported in January in the journal Nature. But beached animals with quantities of large debris in their bellies are rare in the coastal U.K., SMASS Stranding Coordinator Nick Davison told Live Science.

In the recent stranding, the assortment of trash in the sperm whale's gut underscores the global issue of widespread marine pollution caused by a range of human activities — on land and in the seas, according to the Facebook post. 

"This whale had debris in its stomach which seemed to have originated from both the land and fishing sectors, and could have been swallowed at any point between Norway and the Azores," SMASS representatives wrote on Facebook. "We are looking in more detail to see if we can work out quite why this animal ended up with so much of it in its stomach."

Originally published on Live Science.

  • Citizen4theanimals
    Another sign that humans are destroying this once beautiful planet.
    Reply
  • nolliabed
    "Another sign that humans are destroying this once beautiful planet. "..........................................how arrogant you must be to think that we little nothing humans can destroy the planet. The planet will be fine. We, on the other hand, will not last. In fact, the dinosaurs were on this planet a lot longer than we will be on it. Then once again the planet will do what it always has done........................and it will be fine.
    Reply
  • BarbA-USA
    nolliabed said:
    "Another sign that humans are destroying this once beautiful planet. "..........................................how arrogant you must be to think that we little nothing humans can destroy the planet. The planet will be fine. We, on the other hand, will not last. In fact, the dinosaurs were on this planet a lot longer than we will be on it. Then once again the planet will do what it always has done........................and it will be fine.
    You have no idea how long humans are destined to be on this planet. However, I can guarantee you it would be a lot longer if we weren't destroying the very environment that supports our species. Also, a planet can be destroyed by environmental changes, never to recover. No one knows whats out there, maybe there have been other civilizations that have destroyed their home planet and themselves in doing so. We little humans arevsmaller than grains of sand in the universe and have no idea what's possible.
    Reply
  • Als10Point
    I feel sad for the death of such a majestic animal.

    One suggestion to curb the massive amounts of waste floating in our oceans - and it's absolutely criminal - is for everyone to call 1-800-China/Japan/SE Asia (in general)/India/UE/+more - and, dare I even say it, RUSSIA - or was it UKRAINE, I'm just so confused these days - and stop blaming the freaking USA as the being the big bad country and biggest environmental violator on the planet! Not that this article suggested that at all - it seemed like a good time to vent. The USA has done more, though probably not enough, to improve the environment over the past 20-years than all of those countries combined. IMHO Cheers
    Reply