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US Injury Death Rates: Full State Rankings

A map of injury death rates in the United States by state
A new report shows the rate of death from injuries in each state. (Image credit: Trust for America's Health/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)

Nearly 193,000 people in the United States die from injuries each year, including those sustained in car crashes, falls, fires and drug overdoses.

A new report calculates the rate of death from injury in each state, between 2011 and 2013. Below are the full rankings, listed from highest to lowest, in terms of the number of deaths per 100,000 people in the state:

1. West Virginia: 97.9 

2. New Mexico: 92.7 

3. Oklahoma: 88.4 

4. Montana: 85.1 

5. Wyoming: 84.6 

6. Alaska: 83.5 

7. Kentucky: 81.7 

8. Mississippi: 81.0 

9. Tennessee: 76.7 

10. Arkansas: 75.3 

11. Louisiana: 75.3 

12. Arizona: 73.4 

13. Alabama: 73.3 

14. Utah: 72.8 

15. Missouri: 72.4 

16. Colorado: 70.7 

17. South Carolina: 69.9 

18. Idaho: 69.1 

19. Tie: Nevada and South Dakota, 67.1 

21. Vermont: 66.0 

22. Kansas: 65.0

23. Pennsylvania: 64.3 

24. Ohio: 63.9 

25. Indiana: 63.7 

26. North Carolina: 62.1

27. Wisconsin: 62.0 

28. Oregon: 61.8

29. Florida: 61.3

30. Michigan: 60.6 

31. Maine: 60.1 

32. Delaware: 60.0 

33. North Dakota: 59.3 

34. Rhode Island: 58.6 

35. Georgia: 58.1 

36. Washington: 57.1 

37. New Hampshire: 56.6 

38. Iowa: 56.4 

39. Texas: 55.3 

40. Minnesota: 54.9 

41. District of Columbia: 53.7 

42. Maryland: 53.4 

43. Nebraska: 52.5 

44. Virginia: 52.0 

45. Illinois: 50.0 

46. Connecticut: 49.6 

47. Hawaii: 48.8 

48. California: 44.6 

49. New Jersey: 44.0 

50. Massachusetts: 42.9 

51. New York: 40.3 

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Rachael Rettner

Rachael has been with Live Science since 2010. She has a master's degree in journalism from New York University's Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program. She also holds a B.S. in molecular biology and an M.S. in biology from the University of California, San Diego. Her work has appeared in Scienceline, The Washington Post and Scientific American.