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In Photos: Mammals Through Time

Mammal Fossil

The holotype specimen of <em>Senshou lui</em>, which represents a new species of euharamiyidan mammal, described in the Sept. 11, 2014, issue of the journal Nature.

(Image credit: ©AMNH/J. Meng)

The holotype specimen of Senshou lui, which represents a new species of euharamiyidan mammal, described in the Sept. 11, 2014, issue of the journal Nature. It is a nearly complete skeleton that indicates a gracile body with a tail and long fingers that were adapted for an arboreal life in Jurassic forests. [Read full story]

Jeanna Bryner
Jeanna Bryner

Jeanna is the editor-in-chief of Live Science. Previously, she was an assistant editor at Scholastic's Science World magazine. Jeanna has an English degree from Salisbury University, a master's degree in biogeochemistry and environmental sciences from the University of Maryland, and a graduate science journalism degree from New York University. She has worked as a biologist in Florida, where she monitored wetlands and did field surveys for endangered species. She also received an ocean sciences journalism fellowship from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.