Skip to main content

In photos: A bone from a Denisovan-Neanderthal hybrid

Working with DNA

Denisova Cave discoveries

(Image credit: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology)

Evolutionary geneticist Matthias Meyer at work in the clean laboratory at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Analyzing the genome

Denisova Cave discoveries

(Image credit: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology)

Automated processes generate DNA libraries and isolate DNA.

Ancient humans

Denisova Cave discoveries

(Image credit: Karsten Möbius)

Svante Pääbo, lead author of the new study and director at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, stands with a replica of a Neanderthal skeleton.

Mingling populations

Denisova Cave discoveries

(Image credit: Petra Korlević)

Drawing of a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father with their child, a girl, at Denisova Cave in Russia.

Tia Ghose

Tia is the assistant managing editor and was previously a senior writer for Live Science. Her work has appeared in Scientific American, Wired.com and other outlets. She holds a master's in bioengineering from the University of Washington, a graduate certificate in science writing from UC Santa Cruz and a bachelor's in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Tia was part of a team at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that published the Empty Cradles series on preterm births, which won multiple awards, including the 2012 Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism.