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In Photos: The Best Signs from the 2017 March for Science

A woman's place

The rain didn't dampen the spirits of marchers in Washington, D.C.

(Image credit: Jeanna Bryner/Live Science)

The rain didn't dampen the spirits of marchers in Washington, D.C.

Muppet pride

A nuclear physicist and his entomologist wife dressed up as the muppets Beaker and Bunsen for the March for Science in Washington, D.C.

(Image credit: Jeanna Bryner/Live Science)

Richard Longland, a nuclear physicist at North Carolina State University, and his wife Julie Miranda Longland, an entomologist who works for an agricultural company in North Carolina, dressed up as Beaker and Bunsen.

"I have a more a more immediate reason ā€” the selfish reason [for marching] is I get funding from the Department of Energy, which is now headed by Rick Perry, who didn’t even know what the Department of Energy was, which is a little unfair of me to pick on Rick Perry but he's a sign of a bigger problem, putting people in charge of things that have no respect for them, that want to dismantle them," Richard Longland told Live Science.

"I'm marching to show people the importance of science; people will see all these people here who support science. I'm not trying to change people's minds with it." Longland said. "I think it’s exciting that people from different scientific backgrounds can get together and support each other," he added.

Scientific process

Marchers in Washington had a special message for the Trump administration.

(Image credit: Jeanna Bryner/Live Science)

Marchers in Washington had a special message for the Trump administration.

Celebrating women

Marchers celebrate pioneering female scientists while standing in front of the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

(Image credit: Jeanna Bryner/Live Science)

Marchers celebrate pioneering female scientists while standing in front of the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

Against alternative facts

A woman holds a sign that reads, "Science is not an alternative fact" during the March for Science in Berlin, Germany.

(Image credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

A woman holds a sign that reads, "Science is not an alternative fact" during the March for Science in Berlin, Germany.

No borders

Marchers show their support for science and call attention to climate change in Berlin, Germany.

(Image credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Marchers show their support for science and call attention to climate change in Berlin, Germany.

Marching in Boston

Hundreds of community members from Harvard University and MIT march across the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge to join the March for Science at the Boston Common on April 22, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts.

(Image credit: Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

Hundreds of community members from Harvard University and MIT march across the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge to join the March for Science at the Boston Common on April 22, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts.

Planetary power

Marchers showed their love for space science in New York City.

(Image credit: Hanneke Weitering/Live Science)

Marchers showed their love for space science in New York City.

E=mc2

Albert Einstein is back? The genius physicist made a (cardboard) appearance at the March for Science in New York City.

(Image credit: Hanneke Weitering/Live Science)

Albert Einstein is back? The genius physicist made a (cardboard) appearance at the March for Science in New York City.

Rise up

A marcher calls attention to rising sea levels during the March for Science in Los Angeles.

(Image credit: Calla Cofield/Live Science)

A marcher calls attention to rising sea levels during the March for Science in Los Angeles.