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Gallery: 'Street View' of Denali National Park

Bears and Buses

Buses and bears in Denali

(Image credit: Ron Karpilo, one-time use only)

Bear cubs pad between park buses on July 3, 2012 in Denali National Park and Preserve. A new project seeks to monitor the landscape around the park's only road for environmental change.

Denali Caribou

Denali national park caribou

(Image credit: Ron Karpilo, one-time use only)

A caribou crosses the road at Sable Pass in Denali National Park in front of a park bus. Only park vehicles are permitted on most of the park road.

Denali Landslide

Denali landslide

(Image credit: Denny Capps/National Park Service)

A landslide covers part of Denali's Park Road 37 miles (60 kilometers) from the entrance to the park. The slide was discovered on Wed., Oct. 23, 2013.

Blocked Denali Road

Denali landslide

(Image credit: Denny Capps/National Park Service)

Road crews have cleared this slide, which blocked part of Denali's Park Road that was already closed for the season.

Investigating Denali's Landslide

Denali landslide

(Image credit: Denny Capps/National Park Service)

Park officials investiagte a landslide discovered on Oct. 23, 3013. By early November, crews had cleared the road.

Major Denali Landslide

Denali landslide

(Image credit: Denny Capps/National Park Service)

An image of the Denali Park Road landslide, which moved tons of soil and rock over the park's only road.

Before the Landslide

Landslide before in Denali

(Image credit: Ron Karpilo, one-time use only)

An environmental monitoring project undertaken in the summer of 2013 reveals this groundwater seep along the Park Road at the point where the landslide occured. This seep could have been an early clue that the ground at this spot was unstable.

Pre-Landslide Seep

denali before landslide

(Image credit: Ron Karpilo, one-time use only)

Seeping groundwater in summer 2013 marks the spot where a landslide would occur over the next winter.

Ron Karpilo

Ron Karpilo photographing a glacier

(Image credit: Guy Adema, one-time-use only)

Geologist Ron Karpilo has been photographing glaciers and landscapes in Alaska to track the receeding ice over time. Here, he snaps a shot of Muldrow Glacier in Denali National Park.

Polychrome Glaciers in 1916

Polychrome glaciers in 1916

(Image credit: Stephen R. Capps/U.S. Geological Survey)

July 18, 1916, Polycrome Glaciers, Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, United States. Image made by U.S. Geological Survey geologist Stephen Reid Capps. Geologist Ron Karpilo takes modern photographs from the same angle as old USGS shots, providing a record of ice loss in Alaska.

Polychrome Glaciers Today

Polychrome glaciers in 2011

(Image credit: Ron Karpilo, one-time use only)

Ron Karpilo's June 2011 photograph of the Polychrome glaciers from the same angle as the 1916 photograph reveal how much the ice has retreated.