Skip to main content

Photos: Honey Badgers and Other Tiny Predators Caught on Camera

Marsh Mongoose

(Image credit: Laila Bahaa-el-din/Panthera)

The marsh mongoose, or Atilax paludinosus, was one of several small carnivores captured in photos from camera-trap surveys in the Central African rainforests of Gabon.

Black-footed Mongoose

(Image credit: Laila Bahaa-el-din/Panthera)

Researchers used camera-trap data as well as bushmeat studies and field observations to take stock of Gabon's tiny predators, like the black-footed mongoose (Bdeogale nigripes) shown here.

Honey Badger Don't Care

(Image credit: Laila Bahaa-el-din/Panthera)

Gabon's wildlife includes viral video celebrity, the honey badger (Mellivora capensis), a small but tenacious hunter that's known to eat snakes, raid beehives and stand up to lions.

African Civet

(Image credit: Laila Bahaa-el-din/Panthera)

Nocturnal African civets (Civettictis civetta) are found all throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

Servaline Genet

(Image credit: Laila Bahaa-el-din/Panthera)

Though many species of small carnivores are widespread and not under threat, researchers worry that the growing bushmeat trade could potentially impact these populations. The servaline genet (Genetta servalina) is shown here.

African Palm Civet

(Image credit: Laila Bahaa-el-din/Panthera)

The African palm civet (Nandinia binotata) was spotted in this camera trap photo.

Egyptian Mongoose

(Image credit: Laila Bahaa-el-din/Panthera)

The survey resulted in a range-extension for the Egyptian mongoose.

Long-nosed Mongoose

(Image credit: Laila Bahaa-el-din/Panthera)

The long-nosed mongoose (Herpestes naso) is widespread in the Congo forest basin.