Skip to main content

Gallery: In Search of the Grave of Richard III

Greyfriars Trench

Greyfriars church excavation

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

Archaeologists excavate a third trench in the Leicester City Council Parking lot, investigating the boundaries of a medieval church wall.

Herrick's Garden

Philippa Langley in Robert Herrick's garden.

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

Richard III society member Philippa Langley crouches amid paving stones which may belong to a 17th-century garden containing a memorial to the lost king.

Church Window Fragments

Church window of Greyfriars

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

Fragments that may belong to the east window of Greyfriar's church.

Window Fragments

Church window of Greyfriars

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

Archaeologists believe the church's east window may be near the site of Richard III's grave.

Window Lead

Lead window fragment from Greyfriars

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

This twisted lead fragment would have supported a stained glass window.

Medieval Penny

Medieval penny in Leicester

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

A silver medieval penny found at the Greyfriar's site.

Stone Frieze

A stone frieze found in Leicester

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

A stone frieze which may be from the choir stall of Greyfriar's church.

Inlaid Floor Tile

Greyfriars church tile

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

A 14th-century inlaid floor tile belonging to the church of the Greyfriars.

Copper Letters

Copper church letters from Greyfriars

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

These copper letters may have been part of the tomb inscriptions at the Greyfriars cemetery.

Excavating a Path

Excavating at Greyfriars

(Image credit: University of Leicester)

Richard III society member Karen Ladniuk cleans a path made from re-used medieval tiles at the site where human remains possibly belonging to King Richard III have been found.

Stephanie Pappas
Stephanie Pappas is a contributing writer for Live Science. She covers the world of human and animal behavior, as well as paleontology and other science topics. Stephanie has a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of South Carolina and a graduate certificate in science communication from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has ducked under a glacier in Switzerland and poked hot lava with a stick in Hawaii. Stephanie hails from East Tennessee, the global center for salamander diversity. Follow Stephanie on Google+.