Tyrannosaurus rex may have gone extinct about 65 million years ago, but that didn’t stop four international experts from diving into a gory and gut-filled autopsy of the giant beast. National Geographic and its scientific collaborators made the fake specimen as realistic as possible, giving the “dead" T. rex 50 serrated teeth, bristlelike protofeathers and even shock-absorbing pads on its feet. [Read a Q&A with a paleontologist star in "T. rex Autopsy"

On display

 

T. rex on display in the custom-designed biology lab prior to autopsy. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman)


Those in charge

 

Executive Producers (left to right), Allan Butler (NGC US), Ed Sayer (NGCI), Paul Wooding (Impossible Factual) and the man responsible for the T. rex build, Jez Gibson-Harris (Crawley Creatures) stand before their creation. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Awaiting the procedure

 

T. rex on display in the custom-designed biology lab prior to autopsy. (Photo Credit: National Geographic Channels/Christopher Albert.)


What big claws you have...

 

Detail of T. rex claw. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Doctors in the house

 

From left to right, Dr. Steve Brusatte, Dr. Tori Herridge and Dr. Luke Gamble scrub in for the autopsy. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


On a mission

 

The scientists enter the specially constructed biology lab. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Aging the beast

 

Dr. Luke Gamble takes a chainsaw to the T. rex leg to get a cross section of its bone, from which its age will be extrapolated. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


An examination

 

Dr. Tori Herridge examines the severed T. rex leg as Dr. Steve Brusatte photographs the foot. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


The first cut

 

Dr. Luke Gamble makes the first incisions into the T. rex with a blade as Dr. Steve Brusatte looks on. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Physical labor

 

Drs. Luke Gamble and Tori Herridge catch their breath after lifting the T. rex' heavy internal organs out of the body. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Reviewing the last meal

 

Dr. Steve Brusatte and Matthew T. Mossbrucker lift the T. rex' stomach out of the body. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Surveying their work

 

The team, (left to right) Dr. Steve Brusatte, Dr. Luke Gamble, Dr. Tori Herridge Matthew T. Mossbrucker, have removed the T. rex' stomach. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Big chompers

 

Dr. Luke Gamble examines the T. rex's teeth. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Extra large foot

 

Dr. Tori Herridge and Dr. Steve Brusatte examine the T. rex foot. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Discussing the dissection

 

Dr. Tori Herridge, Dr. Steve Brusatte, Matthew T. Mossbrucker and Dr. Luke Gamble examine the T. rex's hind quarters. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Opening the animal

 

Dr. Luke Gamble slices open the T. rex abdomen with assistance from Dr. Steve Brusatte (left), Dr. Tori Herridge and Matthew T. Mossbrucker (right). (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Multiple exams at once

 

Dr. Steve Brusatte and Dr. Tori Herridge examine the T. rex teeth while Dr. Luke Gamble and Matthew T. Mossbrucker examine its gastralia. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Dental exam

 

Drs. Brusatte and Herridge examine the T. rex's teeth with a clamp and manual assistance. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


You don't have the guts

 

Dr. Luke Gamble hands his colleagues the T. rex's intestines from inside the body cavity. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


The right doc for the job

Palaeobiologist 

Palaeobiologist Dr. Tori Herridge brings her scientific expertise to bear in T. rex Autopsy. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Bringing his knowledge

 

Museum curator and fossil expert Matthew T. Mossbrucker shares his understanding of dinosaurs in T. rex Autopsy. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Examining the insides

 

Dr. Tori Herridge, Dr. Luke Gamble, Matthew T. Mossbrucker and Dr. Steve Brusatte (left to right) separate the T. rex's stomach. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


What a heart!

 

Matthew T. Mossbrucker, Dr. Luke Gamble, Dr. Steve Brusatte and Dr. Tori Herridge (left to right) with the T. rex's removed organs (lung, heart & intestines). (Photo credit:  National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Better to see you with

 

Dr. Luke Gamble and Dr. Tori Herridge prepare to remove the T. rex's eye as Dr. Steve Brusatte and Matthew T. Mossbrucker look on. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Tools of the job

 

Dr. Luke Gamble with chainsaw as he prepares to cut into the T. rex. Matthew T. Mossbrucker, Dr. Steve Brusatte and Dr. Tori Herridge (left to right) in the background. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Getting the details

 

Drs. Steve Brusatte and Dr. Tori Herridge examine T. rex bone sample. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Keeping their distance

 

The film crew can't quite follow Drs. Luke Gamble and Steve Brusatte as they examine the T. rex's innards. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Dissecting the heart

 

Matthew T. Mossbrucker, Dr. Luke Gamble, Dr. Tori  Herridge, Dr. Steve Brusatte (left to right) slice open the T. rex heart. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Egg-celent

 

Dr. Tori Herridge retrieves an egg from the T. rex via its cloaca. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Mid-autopsy

 

The T. rex's stomach and intestines have been removed. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Last meal

 

Matthew T. Mossbrucker, left, and Dr. Steve Brusatte examine the contents of the T. rex's stomach. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


A big-hearted creature

 

Exterior of the T. rex's heart. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Messy work

 

Bloody boots. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Dissection of the heart

 

Interior of the T. rex's heart once sliced open. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


A different perspective

 

Dr. Herridge, Dr. Gamble and Mossbrucker examine the T. rex's eye following its removal. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)


Another exam

 

Dr. Tori Herridge reaches into the T. rex's cloaca. (Photo credit: National Geographic Channels/Stuart Freedman.)