Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

<i>Hirondellea gigas</i> are the goats of the sea — they'll eat any organic material that floats down from above, including pollutants.
Hirondellea gigas are the goats of the sea — they'll eat any organic material that floats down from above, including pollutants.
Credit: Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University

A recent study of creatures living in some of the deepest places in the ocean revealed disturbingly high levels of pollutants.

Scientists captured and tested crustaceans from the Mariana Trench, comparing them with crabs from the Liaohe River, one of the most polluted in China. Tests found incredibly high amounts of pollution in the deep-sea animals. [Read more about pollution in the Mariana Trench.]

Fatal overdoses from cocaine use in the U.S. are on the rise. A recent study revealed an increase in the number of deaths due to a combination of cocaine and opioids. [Read more about the drug connection.]

A new material that is as thin as aluminum foil can be used to cool houses or power plants without using any electricity or water. The material manipulates the properties of light to reflect the sun's rays while allowing objects beneath it to passively radiate heat to cool off.
A new material that is as thin as aluminum foil can be used to cool houses or power plants without using any electricity or water. The material manipulates the properties of light to reflect the sun's rays while allowing objects beneath it to passively radiate heat to cool off.
Credit: Glenn Asakawa

A simple-to-produce material could one day cool buildings without power. The futuristic supermaterial cools using radiative cooling, just like Earth. [Read more about the futuristic wrap.]

Desert ants walk on treadmills to help scientists understand homing behavior.
Desert ants walk on treadmills to help scientists understand homing behavior.
Credit: Matthias Wittlinger

Studying how animals move can be tricky. Scientists have devised a unique way to study them — by having them run and walk on treadmills. [Read more about exercising ants.]

Scientists have announced they will conduct another set of radar scans of King Tut's tomb (shown here) to look for any hidden chamber.
Scientists have announced they will conduct another set of radar scans of King Tut's tomb (shown here) to look for any hidden chamber.
Credit: Everett - Art/Shutterstock.com

Archaeologists studying the tomb of Tutankhamun say it may hide a secret chamber with Queen Nefertiti's tomb. So far, scans of the tomb have not revealed any such secrets. [Read more about the secrets of King Tut's Tomb.]

The Lego bot can move each limb independently of the other thanks to its magnetically controlled screws placed in a unique layered magnetic field.
The Lego bot can move each limb independently of the other thanks to its magnetically controlled screws placed in a unique layered magnetic field.
Credit: J. Rahmer and B. Gleich/Philips Research

In the future, troops of microscopic robots may help fight cancer. Scientists have created magnetically controlled swarms of magnetic devices to perform specialized tasks. [Read more about the robot army.]

In South Australia, a battle to the death ensued and was captured on video. A red-bellied snake took on a brown snake and one of them paid the price. [Read more about the dueling snakes.]

An artist's interpretation of an ancient mother <i>Dinocephalosaurus</i> swimming with an embryo developing within her.
An artist's interpretation of an ancient mother Dinocephalosaurus swimming with an embryo developing within her.
Credit: Dinghua Yang

Researchers discovered that the ancient marine reptile known as Dinocephalosaurus gave birth to live young rather than laying eggs. [Read more about the ancient "Nessie".]

The magnetic field surrounding Earth is constantly fluctuating in strength.
The magnetic field surrounding Earth is constantly fluctuating in strength.
Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

Pottery jugs from over 2,500 years ago have secrets of Earth's geomagnetic field. The act of heating to create the jugs locked data about the field into the pieces and experts have unlocked some of those secrets. [Read more about the secrets of the geomagnetic field.]

Fossils of 444-million-year-old sponges from the Anji Biota in China that thrived after the mass extinction.
Fossils of 444-million-year-old sponges from the Anji Biota in China that thrived after the mass extinction.
Credit: J.P. Botting

While sponges may be simple creatures, after a mass extinction some 445 million years ago, they all but ruled the world. The Ordovician mass extinction killed off around 85 percent of all species on Earth at the time. [Read more about the sponges.]

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