Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

This artist’s impression depicts what the view might be like from a planet in the TRAPPIST-1 system.
This artist’s impression depicts what the view might be like from a planet in the TRAPPIST-1 system.
Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser/spaceengine.org

About 40 light-years from Earth, a newly found system boasts seven earth-sized alien planets.

Astronomers found the seven planets orbiting a small star and they may be able to support life. Future examination of the system will search for E.T. and the habitability of the planets. [Read more about Trappist-1.]

Experts have long believed human life expectancy could not reach beyond 90 years old. Exploring the life expectancy of people in 35 countries, some of those researchers are rethinking their hypothesis. [Read more about life expectancy predictions.]

Tigers at the Siberian Tiger Park in Harbin, China, chase down a drone for exercise.
Tigers at the Siberian Tiger Park in Harbin, China, chase down a drone for exercise.
Credit: NBC News

A video showing a group of tigers chasing and catching a drone quickly went viral. Yet, the sanctuary in question may not be working for the good and care of the tigers it houses. [Read more about tiger sanctuaries.]

A rendering showing an aurochs (pronounced aur-ox), an extinct wild, that was made by some of Europe's first human inhabitants.
A rendering showing an aurochs (pronounced aur-ox), an extinct wild, that was made by some of Europe's first human inhabitants.
Credit: Photo and drawing by R. Bourrillon

A painting technique developed in the 1880s may actually have been utilized by inhabitants of the Vézère Vally in France. [Read more about pointilism.]

Mike Spilde, a professor at the University of New Mexico, gazes at giant selenite crystals in a chamber in the Naica Mine.
Mike Spilde, a professor at the University of New Mexico, gazes at giant selenite crystals in a chamber in the Naica Mine.
Credit: Penelope Boston / New Mexico Tech

In the Cave of Crystals in Chihuahua, Mexico, researchers have recovered and revived microbes from tens of thousands of years ago. In the Naica Mine is home to several meters-long selenite crystals with fluid stuck inside and scientists have revived the ancient microbes inside. [Read more about the secrets of the crystal cave.]

Looking into how the brain and body process glucose. A recent study revealed that fructose can be created in the brain from glucose. [Read more about the sugar problem.]

A hoverbike prototype that is basically half drone, half motorcycle may make flying like riding a bike — simple. While some might be hoping for a new form of transportation, the Scorpion-3 was designed with extreme sports in mind. [Read more about the hoverbike.]

Past studies drawing a connection between owning a cat and developing psychosis. A parasite known to be carried by felines has been loosely linked to schizophrenia and even hallucinations but a recent, better designed and conducted study debunks those fears. [Read more about the dangers of owning a cat.]

An illustration of the Large Hadron Collider, the world's largest particle accelerator, in Switzerland.
An illustration of the Large Hadron Collider, the world's largest particle accelerator, in Switzerland.
Credit: Daniel Dominguez; Maximilien Brice/CERN

One scientist posits the Large Hadron Collider and the tests run on it has disproved the existence of ghosts definitely. [Read more about the link between the LHC and ghosts.]

A group of scientists used stem cells pulled from the ear of a mouse to grow the delicate sensory hairs that enable hearing. In this study they were able to produce nearly 12,000 hair cells from one mouse ear. Future experiments will determine if the technique can be used to regenerate these cells in humans.[Read more about the experiment.]

Follow Live Science @livescience, Facebook & Google+.