In 2008, a total of 36,035 persons died as a result of suicide, and approximately 666,000 persons visited hospital emergency departments for nonfatal, self-inflicted injuries. A study by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) looked at data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health from 2008 through 2009. [View article: Suicidal Thoughts Highest in Utah, National Survey Finds]

Find your state on this rundown of the study's findings (in alphabetical order), released today (Oct. 20):

Alabama's rate of suicide thought (3.1 percent), and plan (1.1 percent) and attempt (0.2 percent).

Alaska's rate of suicide thought (3.4 percent), and plan (1.0 percent) and attempt (0.2 percent).

Arizona's rate of suicide thought (4.2 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.6 percent).

Arkansas's rate of suicide thought (5.0 percent), and plan (1.3 percent) and attempt (0.9 percent).

California's rate of suicide thought (3.4 percent), and plan (0.1 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Colorado's rate of suicide thought (4.6 percent), and plan (1.0 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Connecticut's rate of suicide thought (4.3percent), and plan (1.2 percent) and attempt (1.0 percent).

Delaware's rate of suicide thought (2.3 percent), and plan (0.5 percent) and attempt (0.1 percent).

District of Columbia's rate of suicide thought (4.5 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Florida's rate of suicide thought (3.7 percent), and plan (1.3 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

Georgia's rate of suicide thought (2.1 percent), and plan (0.1 percent) and attempt (0.1 percent).

Hawaii's rate of suicide thought (3.9 percent), and plan (1.0 percent) and attempt (0.2 percent).

Idaho's rate of suicide thought (6.0 percent), and plan (1.1 percent) and attempt (0.6 percent).

Illinois's rate of suicide thought (4.2 percent), and plan (1.0 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

Indiana's rate of suicide thought (4.6 percent), and plan (1.1 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Iowa's rate of suicide thought (4.0 percent), and plan (1.0 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

Kansas's rate of suicide thought (2.9 percent), and plan (0.7 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

Kentucky's rate of suicide thought (3.6 percent), and plan (0.8 percent) and attempt (0.2 percent).

Louisiana's rate of suicide thought (2.5 percent), and plan (1.0 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Maine's rate of suicide thought (5.1 percent), and plan (2.1 percent) and attempt (0.8 percent).

Maryland's rate of suicide thought (2.9 percent), and plan (0.6 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

Massachusetts's rate of suicide thought (3.7 percent), and plan (1.1 percent) and attempt (0.2 percent).

Michigan's rate of suicide thought (4.4 percent), and plan (1.6 percent) and attempt (0.8 percent).

Minnesota's rate of suicide thought (4.3 percent), and plan (1.5 percent) and attempt (0.8 percent).

Mississippi's rate of suicide thought (2.4 percent), and plan (0.6 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Missouri's rate of suicide thought (4.5 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

Montana's rate of suicide thought (4.3 percent), and plan (1.4 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

Nebraska's rate of suicide thought (4.1 percent), and plan (1.0 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

Nevada's rate of suicide thought (6.5 percent), and plan (2.2 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

New Hampshire's rate of suicide thought (3.0 percent), and plan (1.0 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

New Jersey's rate of suicide thought (2.9 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.6 percent).

New Mexico's rate of suicide thought (4.4 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.7 percent).

New York's rate of suicide thought (3.6 percent), and plan (0.6 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

North Carolina's rate of suicide thought (3.4 percent), and plan (1.1 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

North Dakota's rate of suicide thought (2.7 percent), and plan (0.8 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

Ohio's rate of suicide thought (4.5 percent), and plan (1.4 percent) and attempt (0.7 percent).

Oklahoma's rate of suicide thought (3.0 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Oregon's rate of suicide thought (4.3 percent), and plan (1.5 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Pennsylvania's rate of suicide thought (3.1 percent), and plan (0.6 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

Rhode Island's rate of suicide thought (6.2 percent), and plan (2.8 percent) and attempt (1.5 percent).

South Carolina's rate of suicide thought (3.3 percent), and plan (1.4 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

South Dakota's rate of suicide thought (3.7 percent), and plan (0.6 percent) and attempt (0.4 percent).

Tennessee's rate of suicide thought (3.6 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

Texas's rate of suicide thought (3.2 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.6 percent).

Utah's rate of suicide thought (6.8 percent), and plan (1.5 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

Vermont's rate of suicide thought (3.9 percent), and plan (1.5 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

Virginia's rate of suicide thought (2.8 percent), and plan (0.5 percent) and attempt (0.3 percent).

Washington's rate of suicide thought (4.7 percent), and plan (1.4 percent) and attempt (0.7 percent).

West Virginia's rate of suicide thought (4.4 percent), and plan (0.9 percent) and attempt (0.7 percent).

Wisconsin's rate of suicide thought (4.3 percent), and plan (1.1 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

Wyoming's rate of suicide thought (5.1 percent), and plan (1.4 percent) and attempt (0.5 percent).

You can follow LiveScience staff writer Jennifer Welsh on Twitter @microbelover. Follow LiveScience for the latest in science news and discoveries on Twitter @livescience and on Facebook.