Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

This 2,000-year-old black, granite sarcophagus was found in Alexandria, Egypt. Inside, archaeologists found a mix of sewage and skeletons.
This 2,000-year-old black, granite sarcophagus was found in Alexandria, Egypt. Inside, archaeologists found a mix of sewage and skeletons.
Credit: Courtesy Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities

A mysterious, black, granite sarcophagus discovered in Alexandria, Egypt, dating to a time after Alexander the Great conquered the area in 332 B.C., has been opened.

The sarcophagus, which is nearly 9 feet long, 5 feet wide and 6 feet tall (2.7 by 1.5 by 1.8 meters) — the largest found in Alexandria — was discovered with a thick layer of mortar covering much of it. [Read more about the find.]

A mummified specimen from Chile's Atacama region prompted speculation for a decade about the find's peculiar skull.
A mummified specimen from Chile's Atacama region prompted speculation for a decade about the find's peculiar skull.
Credit: Dr. Steven Greer/SiriusDisclosure.com

The severely elongated head of a preserved skeleton found in Peru's Atacama Desert in 2003 is so unusual that it initially prompted people to suggest that the diminutive body was that of an extraterrestrial.

In the new paper, the authors pointed out that the mummy's unusual-looking skull and body were not necessarily the result of "anomalies," as the previous research suggested. [Read more about the concerns.]

Physicists were able to pack three qubits into each of six entangled photons.
Physicists were able to pack three qubits into each of six entangled photons.
Credit: MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty

Scientists have just packed 18 qubits — the most basic units of quantum computing — into just six weirdly connected photons. That's an unprecedented three qubits per photon, and a record for the number of qubits linked to one another via quantum entanglement. [Read more about the record.]

That special mineral that humans use to profess their love for one another? It might not be so special. A new study suggests that Earth's interior is filled with a quadrillion tons of diamonds.

A group of researchers from various universities around the world discovered the glitzy stash by looking at seismic waves beneath the Earth. [Read more about the gems.]

The Shroud of Turin is believed by some to be the burial cloth of Jesus of Nazareth. Currently, the cloth is on display at the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin, Italy.
The Shroud of Turin is believed by some to be the burial cloth of Jesus of Nazareth. Currently, the cloth is on display at the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin, Italy.
Credit: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images

The Shroud of Turin is said by some to be the burial cloth of Jesus and by others a medieval forgery. Now, a new study using modern forensic techniques suggests the bloodstains on the shroud are completely unrealistic, supporting arguments that it is a fake. [Read more about the study.]

The stern of a recently-found shipwreck that a South Korean company is claiming belongs to the Dmitrii Donskoi Russian warship.
The stern of a recently-found shipwreck that a South Korean company is claiming belongs to the Dmitrii Donskoi Russian warship.
Credit: Courtesy of Shinil Group

A South Korean company is claiming that they have discovered a long-sought Russian warship that sank during the 1904-1905 Russo-Japanese war off a Korean Island. They are speculating that the Dmitrii Donskoi ship, could contain $132 billion worth of gold, according to recent news reports. [Read more about the treasure.]

Sorry, you probably don't remember this.
Sorry, you probably don't remember this.
Credit: Shutterstock

What is your first memory? A vivid scene may come to mind, seen from toddler eyes. Unfortunately, that scene may be a work of fiction, a new study finds.

In the study, published July 17 in the journal Psychological Science, more than 6,600 participants ages 11 to 100 years old were asked to detail their first memories and the age at which the memories occurred. [Read more about the fabrication.]

Crop marks caused by warm weather have revealed an buried henge monument in a field to the south of Newgrange.
Crop marks caused by warm weather have revealed an buried henge monument in a field to the south of Newgrange.
Credit: Anthony Murphy and Ken Williams/Ireland National Monuments Service

A drone flyby has revealed a prehistoric henge, or circular monument, in a field next to the 5,000-year-old passage tomb at Newgrange in Ireland. The new henge is the fourth one discovered near the Newgrange tomb. [Read more about monument.]

Skeletal remains from a Xiaophis myanmarensis snake hatchling were found in a piece of amber from Myanmar.
Skeletal remains from a Xiaophis myanmarensis snake hatchling were found in a piece of amber from Myanmar.
Credit: Ming Bai/Chinese Academy of Sciences

A newly hatched baby snake that crawled out of an egg 99 million years ago in Southeast Asia never had the chance to grow up. Instead, it met a sticky end in a patch of resin that eventually formed the wee snake's amber tomb.

Inside the amber, the scientists found about half of the vertebrae of an intact fetal or newborn snake. [Read more about the fossil.]

An artist's rendition of subatomic particle movement. Neutrino physicists examined neutrinos detected by the IceCube Observatory, and found that they adhere to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.
An artist's rendition of subatomic particle movement. Neutrino physicists examined neutrinos detected by the IceCube Observatory, and found that they adhere to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.
Credit: Shutterstock

Once again, scientists have shown that Albert Einstein's theory of special relativity is right — this time, thanks to a particle detector buried deep beneath Antarctica.

If the principle of Lorentz symmetry holds, a neutrino of a given mass should oscillate at a predictable rate — meaning a neutrino should travel a certain distance before transforming into a muon. Any deviation in that rate could be a sign that our universe doesn't work the way Einstein predicted. [Read more about the theory.]

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