Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

This black granite sarcophagus was found in a tomb in Alexandria, Egypt. Dating back over 2,000 years, it is the largest sarcophagus ever found in Alexandria, archaeologists believe.
This black granite sarcophagus was found in a tomb in Alexandria, Egypt. Dating back over 2,000 years, it is the largest sarcophagus ever found in Alexandria, archaeologists believe.
Credit: Courtesy Egypt Antiquities Ministry

A massive black granite sarcophagus and a sculpture of a man who may be buried inside have been discovered in a tomb in Alexandria, Egypt.

A team from Egypt's antiquities ministry was inspecting an area of land in the Sidi Gaber district before construction work on a building began when the members came upon the mysterious coffin. [Read more about the mystery.]

An artist's illustration shows the supermassive black hole at the center of a blazar galaxy emitting its stream of energetic particles toward Earth.
An artist's illustration shows the supermassive black hole at the center of a blazar galaxy emitting its stream of energetic particles toward Earth.
Credit: DESY, Science Communication Lab

A single, high-energy neutrino struck Earth on Sept. 22, 2017. It came from a distant galaxy, wrapped around a supermassive black hole. And, beginning with a blockbuster paper published today (July 12) in the journal Science and signed by hundreds of scientists spread across dozens of laboratories, it's leading giddy astrophysicists to rewrite their models of the universe. [Read more about the particle.]

Viking 2 takes a selfie on Mars’ Utopian Plain. While analyzing the nearby soil, the NASA lander may have inadvertently destroyed the first signs of life on Mars.
Viking 2 takes a selfie on Mars’ Utopian Plain. While analyzing the nearby soil, the NASA lander may have inadvertently destroyed the first signs of life on Mars.
Credit: NASA/JPL

In the late 1970s, two Viking robots sailed to Mars, pillaged the soil and burnt any traces of life they found. [Read more about destruction.]

A CT scan of the woman's face shows the orbital fracture on the right side of the image (her left side). Normally, air (which appears black in the scan) should fill the sinus cavities, but the fracture allowed fat (shown in gray) to leak into the cavity on the right side of the image.
A CT scan of the woman's face shows the orbital fracture on the right side of the image (her left side). Normally, air (which appears black in the scan) should fill the sinus cavities, but the fracture allowed fat (shown in gray) to leak into the cavity on the right side of the image.
Credit: BMJ Case Reports 2018

A British woman who blew her nose a bit too hard didn't just end up with a snot-filled tissue — she also fractured a bone in her left eye socket, according to a new report of her case.

Indeed, one of the bones in the floor of the eye socket is thin and can fracture with such blunt-force injuries, Myers told Live Science. But making the nose-blowing case even more curious, this woman actually fractured a neighboring bone, which is a bit thicker and harder to break, he said. [Read more about the break.]

The French fleur-de-lis symbol engraved on a 16th-century bronze cannon discovered in a shipwreck off the coast of Cape Canaveral, in Florida.
The French fleur-de-lis symbol engraved on a 16th-century bronze cannon discovered in a shipwreck off the coast of Cape Canaveral, in Florida.
Credit: Global Marine Exploration, Inc.

A 16th-century shipwreck that may be all that's left of one of the first European voyages to America holds treasures worth millions of dollars. But now a judge has ruled that the company that discovered the wreck off the coast of Florida has no right to salvage the valuable artifacts. [Read more about the wreck.]

The final two have been successfully extracted from the Tham Luang cave complex in Thailand on Tuesday (July 10), where a total of 12 boys and their 25-year-old coach had been trapped since June 23. This was the third consecutive day of a risky dive rescue that started Monday morning (July 9) local time. Rescuers extracted the first four members of the soccer team on July 8 and the next four the following day. [Read more about the rescue.]

England's Dele Alli spits out water during a match against Colombia at the 2018 World Cup in Moscow.
England's Dele Alli spits out water during a match against Colombia at the 2018 World Cup in Moscow.
Credit: Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty

Close watchers of this year's World Cup may have noticed players engaging in an odd practice: They'll take a swig of liquid, but instead of swallowing, they'll spit it out. [Read more about the spitting.]

A saltwater crocodile (not the one recently captured in Australia) climbs out of an estuary.
A saltwater crocodile (not the one recently captured in Australia) climbs out of an estuary.
Credit: Shutterstock

Australian parks and wildlife rangers captured a monster of a crocodile Monday (July 9), according to The Sydney Morning Herald. The beast was 15 feet 5 inches long (4.7 meters) and weighed a whopping 1,300 lbs. (600 kilograms). [Read more about monster.]

One of the artifacts gets excavated from a layer that is 2.1 million years old. The artifact here is a stone from which three flakes were removed.
One of the artifacts gets excavated from a layer that is 2.1 million years old. The artifact here is a stone from which three flakes were removed.
Credit: Zhaoyu Zhu

Our ancient human relatives got around more than scientists previously thought. Researchers in China excavated stone tools that were likely made by our human ancestors some 2.12 million years ago — the earliest evidence ever discovered of the human lineage outside of Africa.

Several pieces of evidence make a strong case for the researchers' interpretation and dating of these stone tools, the scientists said. [Read more about the evidence.]

When you imagine Earth's oldest color, think pink.
When you imagine Earth's oldest color, think pink.
Credit: iStock/Getty Images Plus

Is bright pink the new black? Well, not exactly, but it is the world's oldest-known color produced by a living organism, according to new research. [Read more about the color.]

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