Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

Depiction of the demon Belphégor, a demon of discovery and of ingenious inventions who often takes the form of a young woman, from J.A.S. Collin de Plancy.
Depiction of the demon Belphégor, a demon of discovery and of ingenious inventions who often takes the form of a young woman, from J.A.S. Collin de Plancy.
Credit: Louis Le Breton/Dictionnaire Infernal

Let's give these numbers a slice of fame, too. [Read more about the numbers.]

Time goes in one direction: forward. Little boys become old men but not vice versa; teacups shatter but never spontaneously reassemble. This cruel and immutable property of the universe, called the "arrow of time," is fundamentally a consequence of the second law of thermodynamics, which dictates that systems will always tend to become more disordered over time. But recently, researchers from the U.S. and Russia have bent that arrow just a bit — at least for subatomic particles. [Read more about the computer.]

An astronomer at Columbia University has a new guess about how hypothetical alien civilizations might be invisibly navigating our galaxy: Firing lasers at binary black holes (twin black holes that orbit each other). [Read more about the travel plans.]

A gigantic solar storm hit Earth about 2,600 years ago, one about 10 times stronger than any solar storm recorded in the modern day, a new study finds. [Read more about the storm.]

An illustration of a woolly mammoth
An illustration of a woolly mammoth
Credit: Shutterstock

A handful of 28,0000-year-old woolly mammoth cell parts were recently "woken up" for a short time in a new experiment, but cloning the ice age beasts is still a long way off. [Read more about the project.]

"I thought it was being friendly."
"I thought it was being friendly."
Credit: ViralHog/YouTube

A paraglider's recent and unexpected close encounter with a belligerent kangaroo left him feeling a little punchy. [Read more about the attack.]

One fox learned the hard way that it's unwise to mess with a flock of dinosaurs. [Read more about the murder.]

Following a storm, a miles-long lake formed in California's Death Valley National Park.
Following a storm, a miles-long lake formed in California's Death Valley National Park.
Credit: Elliot McGucken Fine Art

A 10-mile-long (16 kilometers) lake just popped up in the middle of the hottest place on Earth. [Read more about the water.]

A man developed a severe infection in his ear canal from a cotton swab that spread to the lining of his brain. Above, a brain scan showing two abscesses (marked with arrows) in the lining of the man's brain.
A man developed a severe infection in his ear canal from a cotton swab that spread to the lining of his brain. Above, a brain scan showing two abscesses (marked with arrows) in the lining of the man's brain.
Credit: BMJ Case Reports.

A man in England has sworn off cleaning his ears with cotton swabs after developing a potentially life-threatening infection that not only affected his hearing, but also spread to the lining of his brain and caused neurological symptoms, according to a new report of his case. [Read more about the complication.]

Type D whales could be a new species of killer whale.
Type D whales could be a new species of killer whale.
Credit: J.P. Sylvestre

Killer whales are beautiful and majestic, but there's very little variation in what they look like — their shape, size and coloring are pretty standard from whale to whale. So, when people started spotting killer whales with a noticeably different physique — thinner, with much smaller white eye patches and narrower, sharp dorsal fins — scientists paid attention. [Read more about the pod.]

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