Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are some of the coolest stories in science this week.

A local man discovered the severed head of a wolf that lived over 40,000 years ago.
A local man discovered the severed head of a wolf that lived over 40,000 years ago.
Credit: Albert Protopopov/The Siberian Times

A local man came upon a grizzly site on the shore of the Tirekhtyakh River. [Read more about the wolf.]

The algorithm approximated faces based on gender, ethnicity and age, rather than individual characteristics.
The algorithm approximated faces based on gender, ethnicity and age, rather than individual characteristics.
Credit: Oh et. al.

Successful results matched some of the speakers' physical characteristics. [Read more about the program.]

The hours we spend scrolling through our smartphones appear to be changing our skulls. This may be the reason why some people — especially the younger crowd — are developing a weird, bony spike just above their necks. [Read more about the changes.]

Godzilla's girth and height have changed over the 35 films he's terrorized.
Godzilla's girth and height have changed over the 35 films he's terrorized.
Credit: Artwork created by Noger Chen

Water sinking into the ocean floor has contributed to 400 feet of sea level loss since the destruction of the supercontinent Pangaea, a new study shows. [Read more about the changes.]

A hungry <i>Aristonectes</i> plesiosaur eyes a squid in this illustration.
A hungry Aristonectes plesiosaur eyes a squid in this illustration.
Credit: Nobumichi Tamura/Stocktrek Images via Getty Images

Paleontologists have discovered the remains of an ancient Loch Ness Monster look-alike in freezing Antarctica. And just like the legendary Nessie, it wasn't the runt of the litter. [Read more about the monster.]

A fossil vertebrae of the newly discovered dinosaur species <em>Fostoria dhimbangunmal</em> discovered in opal.
A fossil vertebrae of the newly discovered dinosaur species Fostoria dhimbangunmal discovered in opal.
Credit: Robert A. Smith/Australian Opal Centre

There's a gargantuan secret buried under the largest crater in the solar system, and it weighs more than Hawaii. [Read more about the discovery.]

Although bubble tea pearls could indeed cause constipation, it's unclear how they could show up on a CT scan, experts say. [Read more about the x-ray.]

One of the tombs that archaeologists excavated on the Pamir Plateau.
One of the tombs that archaeologists excavated on the Pamir Plateau.
Credit: Xinhua Wu

Getting high on marijuana may not be a modern pastime, as archaeologists have found the earliest clear evidence to date that people were smoking cannabis for its psychoactive properties some 2,500 years ago. [Read more about the history.]

Scientists equipped seals with temporary satellite tags and sent them swimming under the sea ice in Antarctica to collect data on water conditions.
Scientists equipped seals with temporary satellite tags and sent them swimming under the sea ice in Antarctica to collect data on water conditions.
Credit: Dan Costa/University of California, Santa Cruz

The bizarre holes have been popping up sporadically in the sea ice since the 1970s. [Read more about the mystery.]

Researchers used a sonic black hole to confirm one of Stephen Hawking's theories. [Read more about the black holes.]

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