Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

Researchers recently gave the California two-spot octopus (<em>Octopus bimaculoides</em>) some MDMA to see if they would get high. Turns out, they totally can.
Researchers recently gave the California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides) some MDMA to see if they would get high. Turns out, they totally can.
Credit: Shutterstock

If you give an octopus some Molly, it'll probably ask for a cuddle.

The goal of this peculiar study, published today (Sept. 20) in the journal Current Biology, wasn't just to see if octopuses could get high (spoiler: they sure can), but also to probe the evolutionary history of octopus behavior. [Read more about response.]

Inside this neutron star, the strongest stuff in the universe may be hiding.
Inside this neutron star, the strongest stuff in the universe may be hiding.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

For several years, astrophysicists have noodled with the idea that such a linguini-like tangle of matter might be rippling around inside neutron stars — the relatively small, unbelievably dense stars that form after massive suns collapse under their own gravity. [Read more about the creation.]

Turmeric supplements are popular these days, but for one woman in Arizona, taking a turmeric supplement may have triggered an uncommon liver problem, according to a new report of the case. [Read more about the problem.]

It's well known that organ transplants can pass infectious diseases from donors to recipients in rare cases. But even more rarely, transplants can transmit cancer, as a new case shows.

Passing cancer through an organ transplant is "a very, very uncommon event," said Dr. Lewis Teperman, director of organ transplantation at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, New York, who was not involved in the case. [Read more about the case.]

Minke whale carcass on the beach.
Minke whale carcass on the beach.
Credit: Dave McAleavy/Shutterstock

How do you get rid of a dead whale? Not with a standard dumpster, as the city of Rye, New Hampshire, found out the hard way. [Read more about the mistake.]

A computer model of a ghost bond. The green ball represents the nucleus of the Rydberg atom, while the blue ball represents where the Rydberg's electron most likely is. It also represents where the "ghost" atom is, or where the groundstate atom would be.
A computer model of a ghost bond. The green ball represents the nucleus of the Rydberg atom, while the blue ball represents where the Rydberg's electron most likely is. It also represents where the "ghost" atom is, or where the groundstate atom would be.
Credit: Matt Eiles

Getting upset over nothing? Well, you're not being ridiculous: Some atoms may form actual bonds with "nothing." [Read more about the atom.]

A group of researchers recently observed a mysterious infrared emission coming from near a pulsar in NASA's Hubble Space telescope data. This animation depicts one possible source of the emission: a "fallback disk" or a disk that formed from materials of the parent star falling back into the neutron star after a supernova.
A group of researchers recently observed a mysterious infrared emission coming from near a pulsar in NASA's Hubble Space telescope data. This animation depicts one possible source of the emission: a "fallback disk" or a disk that formed from materials of the parent star falling back into the neutron star after a supernova.
Credit: ESA/N. Tr’Ehnl (Pennsylvania State University)/NASA

Space is filled with bizarre signals that we scramble to put meaning to — and now, researchers have detected yet another mysterious signal. This one emanated from near a neutron star, and for the first time, it's infrared.

This signal, they found, was about 800 light-years away and was "extended," meaning it was spread across a large stretch of space, unlike typical "point" signals from neutron stars that emit X-rays. [Read more about the signal.]

Great white sharks (<em>Carcharodon carcharias</em>) meet annually in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.
Great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) meet annually in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.
Credit: Shutterstock

Each winter, an open ocean void in the deep sea of the mid-Pacific Ocean attracts large crowds of great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) that make the monthlong swim from the coasts of California and Mexico. Scientists followed the sharks to their mysterious ocean lair and discovered a few potential reasons why the fearsome predators might be attracted to the area, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute reported. [Read more about the gathering.]

The Big Falcon Rocket would have three fins and a retractable forward wing, according to an illustration of the rocket’s design released by SpaceX's Elon Musk.
The Big Falcon Rocket would have three fins and a retractable forward wing, according to an illustration of the rocket’s design released by SpaceX's Elon Musk.
Credit: SpaceX

Yusaku Maezawa, founder of clothing company ZoZo, will be the first space tourist to travel around the moon, private spaceflight company SpaceX announced tonight (Sept. 17). If the trip goes as planned (and SpaceX has stepped back promises of tourist trips to the moon before), Maezawa will zoom toward the moon in 2023 in the newly designed Big Falcon Rocket. [Read more about the trip.]

Scientists have discovered that the human eye has a spooky ability. It can detect "ghost images."

An easy way to envision how this works is to think about lidar, which uses a single-point laser to scan a scene. The detector captures how the light from the laser bounces back from each spot in the scene, which can then be reconstructed into an image. [Read more about the strange skill.]

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