Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

Black kites (<i>Milvus migrans</i>) circle near a roadway during a fire on the Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, Australia.
Black kites (Milvus migrans) circle near a roadway during a fire on the Cape York Peninsula in Queensland, Australia.
Credit: Dick Eussen

Grassland fires that are deadly and devastating events for many kinds of wildlife are a boon to certain types of birds known as fire foragers. These opportunists prey on animals fleeing from a blaze, or scavenge the remains of creatures that succumbed to the flames and the smoke. [Read more about the trick.]

The diamonds that are studding the Hypatia stone probably formed from the shock when the space rock blasted through Earth's atmosphere.
The diamonds that are studding the Hypatia stone probably formed from the shock when the space rock blasted through Earth's atmosphere.
Credit: Shutterstock

A tiny chunk of stone that looks like nothing else ever seen in the solar system might be even weirder than scientists thought.

If so — and that is a big "if" — the stone might reveal that the dust cloud that eventually congealed into our solar system was not as uniform as previously believed. [Read more about the rock.]

New research reveals an infinite number of prime numbers exist that are separated by a distance of at most 70 million.
New research reveals an infinite number of prime numbers exist that are separated by a distance of at most 70 million.
Credit: Andreas Guskos Shutterstock.com

There's a new biggest known prime number in the universe. [Read more about the number.]

A pile of dead bats that "boiled" in Campbelltown in the Australian state of New South Wales.
A pile of dead bats that "boiled" in Campbelltown in the Australian state of New South Wales.
Credit: Help Save the Wildlife and Bushlands in Campbelltown

More than 200 bats have lost their lives to southern Australia's ongoing heat wave.

The colony of flying foxes in Campbelltown belong to the species Pteropus poliocephalus, better known as the gray-headed flying fox. [Read more about the heat wave.]

Northern spotted owls in some California counties are succumbing to rat poison used by marijuana growers.
Northern spotted owls in some California counties are succumbing to rat poison used by marijuana growers.
Credit: Shutterstock

If asked, spotted owls would likely vote against marijuana legalization.

It's the contamination of the owls' primary food source — mice and rats, which, like humans, are attracted to the aromatic crop — that has been the animals' undoing. [Read more about the deaths.]

The Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia measured a complicated structure in a fast radio burst from the source FRB 121102. The telescope detected the burst using a new recording system from the Breakthrough Listen project.
The Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia measured a complicated structure in a fast radio burst from the source FRB 121102. The telescope detected the burst using a new recording system from the Breakthrough Listen project.
Credit: Image design: Danielle Futselaar - Photo usage: Shutterstock

New work probes the extraterrestrial source of incredibly powerful explosions of radio waves, investigating why that spot is the only known location to repeatedly burst with these blasts.

To learn more about this FRB, scientists used the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico and the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia to analyze data on 16 bursts from object. [Read more about the star.]

A launchpad photo provided by SpaceX shows the Falcon 9 carrying Zuma
A launchpad photo provided by SpaceX shows the Falcon 9 carrying Zuma
Credit: SpaceX

Something weird is going on with a classified SpaceX payload launched Sunday night (Jan. 7), codenamed Zuma. Either the mission failed, and a U.S. spy satellite was lost in space, per Bloomberg and Wall Street Journal reports that were posted Monday (Jan. 9), or it succeeded, per SpaceX. [Read more about the secretive mission.]

James Hemings was one of the most masterful chefs in the young United Sates. He trained in aristocratic kitchens in France and introduced crème brûlée, meringues and macaroni and cheese into American cooking. He was also enslaved by Thomas Jefferson. [Read more about discovery.]

A man in Spain who was declared dead by three doctors was actually still alive, which doctors discovered only when he began snoring on the autopsy table, according to news reports.

He has now regained consciousness and is in the intensive care unit at the Central University Hospital of Asturias (HUCA) in Oviedo, Spain. But how, exactly, does something like this happen? [Read more about the frightening event.]

A photo provided by the Australian government shows baby sea turtles crawling toward the surf on Raine Island.
A photo provided by the Australian government shows baby sea turtles crawling toward the surf on Raine Island.
Credit: Credit: State of Queensland

The climate is changing, and so are the turtles.

Due to climate change, Raine Island — the site of the key breeding ground in this study — has warmed significantly since the 1990s, the researchers wrote, likely accounting for the hard female skew. [Read more about the turtles.]

You are what you eat — but if you want to get literal about it, you are mostly what you drink. So, how much of that should be water?

You may have heard that you should drink eight 8-ounce (237 milliliters) glasses of water a day (totaling 64 ounces, or about 1.9 liters). That's the wrong answer. [Read more about necessary water.]

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