Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, perched atop the dormant Mauna Kea volcano, recently detected an incredibly powerful solar flare blasting out from the vicinity of Orion's belt.
The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, perched atop the dormant Mauna Kea volcano, recently detected an incredibly powerful solar flare blasting out from the vicinity of Orion's belt.
Credit: Shutterstock

In November 2016, astronomers watched a young star some 1,500 light-years away from Earth belch out an explosion of plasma and radiation that was roughly 10 billion times more powerful than any flare ever seen leaving Earth's sun. This sudden stellar eruption may be the most luminous known flare ever released by a young star — and it could help scientists better understand the still-murky process of star formation. [Read more about the flare.]

The crater is 22 miles (36 km) in diameter and is buried under 1.2 miles (2 km) of ice. It's located close to the Hiawatha impact crater.
The crater is 22 miles (36 km) in diameter and is buried under 1.2 miles (2 km) of ice. It's located close to the Hiawatha impact crater.
Credit: NASA Goddard

Lurking below more than a mile of ice in Greenland is a circular depression that was very likely left by an ancient impact with a space rock. [Read more about the crater.]

A colorful illustration shows the spacecraft of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission passing through the plasma of space.
A colorful illustration shows the spacecraft of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission passing through the plasma of space.
Credit: NASA

Space is warm — or, at least, warmer than it should be. All across the universe, including in our own solar system, astronomers have found that the nearly empty places between the stars and galaxies and other matter contain more heat than existing knowledge can fully explain. [Read more about the waves.]

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reveals its shadow, seen on July 26, 2004, and snapped by the rover’s front hazard-avoidance camera. At the time, Opportunity was moving farther into Endurance Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars.
NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reveals its shadow, seen on July 26, 2004, and snapped by the rover’s front hazard-avoidance camera. At the time, Opportunity was moving farther into Endurance Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Opportunity Rover has died on Mars. The little solar-paneled robot apparently ran out of battery power during the Red Planet's awesome 2018 dust storm, and after one last attempt to contact it, NASA concluded yesterday (Feb. 13) that the far-off explorer is no more. [Read more about the rover.]

Why did the mega-shark megalodon die out? It could have been its highly active metabolism, new research suggests.
Why did the mega-shark megalodon die out? It could have been its highly active metabolism, new research suggests.
Credit: Shutterstock

Millions of years before human beings emerged, a type of shark that grew up to 60 feet (18 meters) long prowled the oceans. Based on the fossil record, scientists suspect that O. megalodon died off about 2.6 million years ago, around the time a lot of other marine species went extinct. (Researchers even recently suggested that the mass die-off may have been the result of a nearby supernova.) [Read more about the competition.]

A glacier from the Larsen B ice shelf, on the Antarctic Peninsula, which completely collapsed in 2002.
A glacier from the Larsen B ice shelf, on the Antarctic Peninsula, which completely collapsed in 2002.
Credit: Armin Rose/Shutterstock

On Jan. 31, 2002, a vast crescent of ice about the size of Rhode Island splintered off of the coast of Antarctica and spilled a flotilla of massive, melting icebergs into the sea. By March, some 1,250 square miles (3,250 square kilometers) of ice had melted away from the continent's edge, undoing more than 10,000 years of growth and stability in a little more than a month. [Read more about the changes.]

Until now, the oldest traces of motility (an organism's ability to move independently using metabolic energy) dated to about 600 million years ago. But now, newly analyzed fossils suggest that motility dates back to 2.1 billion years ago. (Scale bar: 1 centimeter, or 0.4 inches.)
Until now, the oldest traces of motility (an organism's ability to move independently using metabolic energy) dated to about 600 million years ago. But now, newly analyzed fossils suggest that motility dates back to 2.1 billion years ago. (Scale bar: 1 centimeter, or 0.4 inches.)
Credit: A. El Albani/IC2MP/CNRS - Université de Poitiers

About 2.1 billion years ago, a blob-like creature inched along on an early Earth. As the organism moved, it carved out tunnels, which may be the earliest evidence of a moving critter on the planet. [Read more about the fossil.]

Left to right: Sealab aquanauts Sanders Manning, Lester Anderson, Bob Barth and Robert Thompson, 1964.
Left to right: Sealab aquanauts Sanders Manning, Lester Anderson, Bob Barth and Robert Thompson, 1964.
Credit: Courtesy of the Man in the Sea Museum

In the 1960s, NASA's first astronauts tested the limits of human endurance far above the planet. Meanwhile, teams of intrepid divers explored similar boundaries in an equally inhospitable environment here on Earth: the dark, numbingly cold and high-pressure depths of the ocean. [Read more about the tragedy.]

In this artist’s rendition, a plasma jet impact (yellow) generates standing waves at the magnetopause boundary (blue) and in the magnetosphere (green). The outer group of four THEMIS probes recorded the flapping of the magnetopause over each satellite in succession.
In this artist’s rendition, a plasma jet impact (yellow) generates standing waves at the magnetopause boundary (blue) and in the magnetosphere (green). The outer group of four THEMIS probes recorded the flapping of the magnetopause over each satellite in succession.
Credit: E. Masongsong/UCLA, M. Archer/QMUL, H. Hietala/UTU

You may not be able to hear it, but Earth's magnetic shield booms like a drum when it's bombarded by strong impulses, including those from solar wind, a new study finds. [Read more about the field.]

Archaeologists have found many helmets during the survey of the Rome-Carthage battle site. Here, a 3D model of one of of those helmets, created by William M. Murray.
Archaeologists have found many helmets during the survey of the Rome-Carthage battle site. Here, a 3D model of one of of those helmets, created by William M. Murray.
Credit: Courtesy of RPM Nautical Foundation

Archaeologists exploring the site of a naval battle fought 2,200 years ago between Rome and Carthage have uncovered clues to how the battle may have unfolded — as well as several mysteries. [Read more about the battles.]

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