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Images: Denali National Park's Amazing Dinosaur Tracks

Dinosaur Family Dance Party

Denali dinosaur tracks

(Image credit: Perot Museum)

Thanks to an amazing dinosaur track site discovered in Alaska's Denali National Park, scientists now know that duck-billed dinosaurs, also known as hadrosaurs, once roamed in herds under Alaska's midnight sun. [Read the full story.]

Fern prairie

Denali dinosaur tracks

(Image credit: Karen Carr/Perot Museum)

Artist's conception of how the trace fossils were formed roughly 70 million years ago.

Hadrosaur track

Denali dinosaur tracks

(Image credit: Perot Museum)

A medium-sized track from a duck-billed dinosaur that stomped on muddy ground roughly 70 million years ago.

Amazing find

Denali dinosaur tracks

(Image credit: Perot Museum)

Skin impressions, like the one shown here, helped paleontologists see what the bottom of the dinosaur's feet looked like.

Family affair

Denali dinosaur bird tracks

(Image credit: Perot Museum)

Birds lived at the same time as dinosaurs in the Late Cretaceous Period. Here is a bird track from the same layer as the hadrosaur tracks.

Field ferry

Denali dinosaur track research

(Image credit: UNAVCO/Brendan Hodge)

The National Park Service, a study collaborator, used helicopters to ferry hundreds of pounds of equipment and food to the research site.

Dinosaur tracks

Denali dinosaur track research

(Image credit: Perot Museum)

Researchers document the full extent of the amazing dinosaur track site discovered in Denali National Park.

Dino scan

Denali dinosaur track research

(Image credit: UNAVCO/Brendan Hodge)

A high-resolution lidar scan of a hadrosaur footprint from the Denali track site. The footprint is about 1.5 feet (0.5 meters) long.

Cleaning rocks

Denali dinosaur tracks

(Image credit: Perot Museum)

Anthony Fiorillo, curator of earth sciences at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, cleaning a dinosaur track.

Preserved the find

Denali dinosaur track research

(Image credit: Perot Museum)

The tracks were exposed by a landslide, and could be destroyed by another rockfall. Researchers carefully documented the tracks with molds, for further study.

Alaskan summer

Denali dinosaur field work

(Image credit: Perot Museum)

Weather wasn't always sunny in Denali during field work in 2011.