Amaryllis: The World's Flowering Holiday Favorite

Amaryllis Amigo

amaryllis flowers, holiday flowers

(Image credit: White Flower Farm)

Spectacular flowers on tall green stalks and commonly known as amaryllis have become a holiday favorite in homes around the world for their large and beautiful blooms. Of all the flowering bulbs, the many hybrid varieties of amaryllis are the easiest to bring to bloom both indoors and outdoors and for an extended period of time.

Amaryllis Dancing Queen

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(Image credit: White Flower Farm)

The true amaryllis is of the family Amaryllidaceae and has only two known species, both found in the winter rain areas of South Africa. The more common genus of this family is known as Hippeastrum and is native to tropical and subtropical Central and South America. The genus Hippeastrum has nearly 90 species with nearly 700 hybrids and cultivars that easily grow and flower indoors during the cold holiday season of the Northern Hemisphere.

Amaryllis pardinum

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(Image credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher)

One of the first of the Hippeastrum species, Amaryllis pardinum, was discovered by English botanists in Peru in 1866. Bulbs of this species were sent to England and first bloomed in June 1867. The flowers were so beautiful and unlike anything ever seen in Europe before that a genuine sensation rippled through the European botanical community. The spectacular flowers were spotted like a leopard with large, broad petals that show off a beautiful, symmetrical face.

Amaryllis bulb

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(Image credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher)

Bulbs of most Amaryllis are large, measuring about 2 to 5 inches (5 to 10 centimeters) in diameter. From the bulb, a long, erect stem ranging from 12 to 31 inches (30 to 80 cm) in height will grow. Between two to seven leaves will grow from the stem, and depending on the species, two to 15 flowers will bloom. The flowers are large, about 5 to 8 inches (13 to 20 cm) across with three sepals and three petals that are brilliantly colored.

Amaryllis Ferrari

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(Image credit: White Flower Farm)

The name amaryllis finds its origin in Greek mythology. Amaryllis was a shepherdess who loved a shepherd named Alteo. Alteo possessed the beauty of Apollo and the strength of Hercules. Alteo loved flowers and Amaryllis died trying to win Alteo's affection. Upon her death, the blood of her heart created a beautiful crimson flower known today as the amaryllis.

Amaryllis Exotica

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(Image credit: White Flower Farm)

During the 18th century, the amaryllis flowers were commonly known as a lily. Even today, in some parts of the world they still carry that common name. They are called the March lily in South Africa and the Jersey lily in England. The Italians refer to the amaryllis as the Madonna lily, while the people of Portugal call the beautiful flowers the "Bordao de Sao Jose," meaning St. Joseph's staff.

Amaryllis Lemon Star

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(Image credit: White Flower Farm)

The hybrid amaryllis known as Lemon Star first appeared in the United States in 2007. When the spectacular luminescent flowers first open, they have a beautiful yellow cast that lightens to a creamy white as they age. The throat of the flower is a rich green when it first opens, then gradually turns to a yellowy cream.

Aphrodite

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(Image credit: White Flower Farm)

The amaryllis Aphrodite is named after the Greek goddess of love and beauty. This is a double amaryllis with pure white petals whose tips have been brushed with salmon-pink. The lime green throats add amazing contrast to this magnificent flower. It is considered one of the easiest of indoor flowering plants to grow.

Amaryllis Chico

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(Image credit: White Flower Farm)

New, exotic hybrid varieties of amaryllis flowers are now being developed, such as Chico, the flower shown here. Chico has spidery, narrow petals that bend gracefully backward. The burgundy and green blooms make for a unique flower display. This South American tropical beauty is said to resemble exotic tropical birds.

Varieties available

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(Image credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher)

Many varieties of amaryllis bulbs are sold in countless retail stores across the Northern Hemisphere during the holiday season. Amaryllis flowers are only outsold during the Christmas season by the poinsettia. Amaryllis bulbs are easy to grow and thrive in the warm living rooms of homes surrounded by wintery weather.

White Flower Farm

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(Image credit: White Flower Farm, Litchfield, CT, USA)

Many nurseries worldwide sell and ship amaryllis bulbs to the ever-growing number of amaryllis-loving customers. Such reliable sources, like the White Flower Farm of Litchfield, Conn., guarantee their bulbs to be healthy, free of disease and ready to gloriously bloom. Amaryllis bulbs have become a major component of the worldwide flower industry.