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Images: Twin Tornadoes Waterspouts in Action

Birth of a waterspout

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

On May 9, 2012, a scientist caught the birth of twin waterspouts on film.

To the ground

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

The twisters formed at the leading edge of severe weather that swept across Louisiana's Grand Isle.

A second on the way

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

The twin waterspouts lasted about 10 or 15 minutes.

Playing chase

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

Tim Osborn, a scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration who caught the twisters in action, said the waterspouts grew larger, and moved in tandem.

Scary sight

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

This type of waterspout is called a tornadic waterspout, since it forms in the clouds.

Bigger, not better

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

The twin waterspouts were accompanied by pounding rain and powerful winds.

Getting bigger

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

One twister kicks up a halo of spray.

Lift off

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

One tornado barreled across the island, cutting power and damaging homes.

Aftermath

waterspouts

(Image credit: Tim Osborn, NOAA Coast Survey.)

It left a swath of damage a quarter-mile long and 400 feet (122 meters) across. Fortunately, nobody was injured.