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Photos: Ancient Egyptian General's Tomb Discovered in Saqqara

Decorative walls

Saqqara, Egypt tomb

(Image credit: Photo courtesy Egyptian antiquities ministry)

A tomb dating back about 3,300 years has been discovered at the site of Saqqara in Egypt, archaeologists announced May 8, 2018. Hieroglyphic inscriptions say that the tomb was built for an army general named Iwrhya. The inscriptions also mention his son named Yuppa and his grandson named Hatiay. This photo shows part of a scene found on one of the tomb walls. It's unclear from the information released who the individuals in this scene are, although the individual at the far right may be Iwrhya. [Read more about the tomb discovery]

Art for the afterlife

Saqqara, Egypt tomb

(Image credit: Photo courtesy Egyptian antiquities ministry)

The tomb contains a number of structures, including chapels, storerooms, a forecourt and a structure that archaeologists call a "statue room," which contains the remains of a number of artistic scenes. This image shows an entrance to one of the structures.

Beautiful feet

Saqqara, Egypt tomb

(Image credit: Photo courtesy Egyptian antiquities ministry)

The feet and legs of these individuals are well preserved despite the passage of 3,300 years of time. Unfortunately their upper body appears to be lost.

Amazing details

Saqqara, Egypt tomb

(Image credit: Photo courtesy Egyptian antiquities ministry)

Carvings discovered on the tomb walls appear to depict individuals engaged in a ritual.

A work in progress

Saqqara, Egypt tomb

(Image credit: Photo courtesy Egyptian antiquities ministry)

Archaeologists are in the process of uncovering this carving. Excavations are ongoing, and much of the tomb has yet to be excavated. So far, no human remains have been found in the tomb.

Continuing work

Saqqara, Egypt tomb

(Image credit: Photo courtesy Egyptian antiquities ministry)

The tomb was discovered and excavated during the 2017-2018 field season. Excavations are ongoing.

Press conference

Saqqara, Egypt tomb

(Image credit: Photo courtesy Egyptian antiquities ministry)

The team is led by Ola El-Aguizy, a professor of Egyptology at Cairo University. She is shown here speaking at the tomb discovery announcement.