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In Pictures: Twin Brothers' Lifelike, Curved Drawings

Field Museum, Chicago

Field Museum Drawing

(Image credit: © Ryan and Trevor Oakes)

Twins Ryan and Trevor Oakes have developed a drawing technique that captures perspective images on the inside of a sphere.

Chicago Bean

Chicago Bean

(Image credit: © Ryan and Trevor Oakes)

Their technique involves splitting their vision in two, to trace a scene onto a curved canvass that more accurately captures how it appears in real life.

Palazzo Strozzi, Florence

Palazzo Strozzi, Florence

(Image credit: © Ryan and Trevor Oakes)

Using their technique, the twins have produced detailed drawings of the Cloud Gate sculpture ("The Bean") in Chicago, St. Paul's Cathedral in London and the Palazzo Strozzi in Florence, Italy, among others places.

Head Stabilizer

Head stabilizer for drawing

(Image credit: © Ryan and Trevor Oakes)

The twins have developed a special apparatus to keep their heads steady while drawing.

Kelly's Slough, North Dakota

Kelly's Slough, North Dakota

(Image credit: © Ryan and Trevor Oakes)

To understand their drawing method, hold your hand out in front of your face, then focus on the scene behind it and your hand will go transparent. The twins do the same thing with a curved canvas instead in place of a hand, and trace what they see onto the canvas.

Irwin Gardens, The Getty

Irwin Gardens, The Getty

(Image credit: © Ryan and Trevor Oakes)

The canvas is curved, Ryan Oakes said, so it can better represent how the human eye bends entering light to produce an image.

Evergreen Cemetary, Late Winter

Evergreen Cemetary

(Image credit: © Ryan and Trevor Oakes)

Both twins can do the technique, but Trevor Oakes does most of the drawing, while Ryan makes sure everything is set up correctly.

East River Facing Brooklyn

East River Facing Brooklyn

(Image credit: © Ryan and Trevor Oakes)

An exhibit of the twins' work, called "Compounding Visions," is on display at Composite: The Gallery at the National Museum of Mathematics.