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Images of Oregon's New Wolf Pups

First pups

OR-7 wolf pups

(Image credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Two pups born in Oregon are a first for the wandering wolf OR-7, and for Oregon state. These are the first wolves known to reproduce in Oregon since the 1940s.

Wandering wolf

Wolf OR-7

(Image credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Remote camera image of OR-7, seen on May 3, 2014, in the southwest Cascades. The male wolf OR-7 became famous in 2012 when it first crossed into California. OR-7 eventually returned to Oregon after ranging thousands of miles.

Black wolf running

Oregon black wolf

(Image credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Remote camera image of a female wolf in the same remote Oregon Cascades region as OR-7. The image was the first evidence that another wolf was in the same area as OR-7. Most Oregon wolves are in the northeastern corner of the state.

Suspected mate

Black wolf

(Image credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Remote camera photo of a female black wolf suspected to be OR-7's mate. Photo snapped May 4, 2014.

Watchful wolf

Radio-collared wolf

(Image credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

A 72 pound female wolf of the Minam Pack, in northeastern Oregon, after being radio-collared by biologists on June 3, 2014.

Wenaha wolf pups

Wolf pups

(Image credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

Wolf pups of the Wenaha Pack, spotted on May 30, 2012.

Becky Oskin
Becky Oskin covers Earth science, climate change and space, as well as general science topics. Becky was a science reporter at Live Science and The Pasadena Star-News; she has freelanced for New Scientist and the American Institute of Physics. She earned a master's degree in geology from Caltech, a bachelor's degree from Washington State University, and a graduate certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz.